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LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(and then what happened)
Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.
To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.
Would you like to know more? Check out:
#History You Should Know 
#Black/African American 
#Pink Triangle History 
#Flag(s) History 
#Military/Armed Forces 
#Vintage 
#Christian 
#Jewish 
#Muslim 
 

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(and then what happened)

Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.

To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.

Would you like to know more? Check out:

#History You Should Know 

#Black/African American 

#Pink Triangle History 

#Flag(s) History 

#Military/Armed Forces 

#Vintage 

#Christian 

#Jewish 

#Muslim 

 

LGBTQ* Military/Service History
"Undesirable" == "Homosexual"
During WWII the United States Military starting issuing “Blue Discharges.”
A Blue Discharge/Blue Slip was named because of the color paper it was printed on. These slips were used exclusively for dishonorably discharging soldiers accused of being homosexual. Once discharged, a serviceman could NOT receive any government benefits for his service in the armed forces and could be REFUSED employment by anyone.
Side Fact:
The government hired psychologists to find “the homosexual” recruits. When soldiers signed up for the service, they would be asked a series of questions with (code) words that were thought to highlight homosexual behavior. It is projected that for every one LGBTQ* individual who was detained, ten passed. By the third year of World War II, the United States Government told psychologists to stop screening. Every physical body was needed for deployment.

LGBTQ* Military/Service History

"Undesirable" == "Homosexual"

During WWII the United States Military starting issuing “Blue Discharges.”

A Blue Discharge/Blue Slip was named because of the color paper it was printed on. These slips were used exclusively for dishonorably discharging soldiers accused of being homosexual. Once discharged, a serviceman could NOT receive any government benefits for his service in the armed forces and could be REFUSED employment by anyone.

Side Fact:

The government hired psychologists to find “the homosexual” recruits. When soldiers signed up for the service, they would be asked a series of questions with (code) words that were thought to highlight homosexual behavior. It is projected that for every one LGBTQ* individual who was detained, ten passed. By the third year of World War II, the United States Government told psychologists to stop screening. Every physical body was needed for deployment.

LGBTQ* History In The News
Pride Month News You Should Know
(the following text from JPost.com)
Last gay Jewish Holocaust survivor dies
By BENJAMIN WEINTHAL, 
Gad Beck, a resistance fighter during World War II, passes away in Berlin days before his 89th birthday
BERLIN – Gad Beck, an anti-Nazi Zionist resistance fighter and the last known gay Jewish survivor of the Holocaust, died on Sunday in Berlin. He passed away in a senior citizens’ home six days before his 89th birthday, which would have been on June 30.Beck was a pioneering gay activist and educator in a severely anti-homosexual, repressive post-World War II German society. He was famous for his witty, lively style of speaking.On a German talk show, he said, “The Americans in New Yorkcalled me a great hero. I said no… I’m really a little hero.”Perhaps the single most important experience that shaped his life was the wartime effort to rescue his boyfriend. Beck donned a Hitler Youth uniform and entered a deportation center to free his Jewish lover Manfred Lewin, who had declined to separate himself from his family.The Nazis would later deport the entire Lewin family to Auschwitz, where they were murdered.Speaking about his life as a gay Jew, Beck invoked a line frequently cited about homosexuality: “God doesn’t punish for a life of love.”
Read more HERE

For more KNOWhomo posts on the Pink Triangle/gay Holocaust persecution:

A Survivor’s Story — Read Here
Paragraph 175 — Read Here
Pink Triangle History — Read Here
(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here
Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 
Photo Blog Series — Look Here
Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here
Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship —Read Here

LGBTQ* History In The News

Pride Month News You Should Know


(the following text from JPost.com)

Last gay Jewish Holocaust survivor dies

Gad Beck, a resistance fighter during World War II, passes away in Berlin days before his 89th birthday

BERLIN – Gad Beck, an anti-Nazi Zionist resistance fighter and the last known gay Jewish survivor of the Holocaust, died on Sunday in Berlin. He passed away in a senior citizens’ home six days before his 89th birthday, which would have been on June 30.

Beck was a pioneering gay activist and educator in a severely anti-homosexual, repressive post-World War II German society. He was famous for his witty, lively style of speaking.

On a German talk show, he said, “The Americans in New Yorkcalled me a great hero. I said no… I’m really a little hero.”

Perhaps the single most important experience that shaped his life was the wartime effort to rescue his boyfriend. Beck donned a Hitler Youth uniform and entered a deportation center to free his Jewish lover Manfred Lewin, who had declined to separate himself from his family.

The Nazis would later deport the entire Lewin family to Auschwitz, where they were murdered.

Speaking about his life as a gay Jew, Beck invoked a line frequently cited about homosexuality: “God doesn’t punish for a life of love.”

Read more HERE


For more KNOWhomo posts on the Pink Triangle/gay Holocaust persecution:


A Survivor’s Story — Read Here

Paragraph 175 — Read Here

Pink Triangle History — Read Here

(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here

Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 

Photo Blog Series — Look Here

Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here

Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship —Read Here

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

Paragraph 175 & Pink Triangle History

PARAGRAPH 175 — German Criminal Code

May 1871 - March 1994. From 1871 - 1994, over 130,000 men were held/charged with violation of Paragraph 175. For 123 years, this code criminalized homosexual acts between two men in Germany. It was with this law that homosexuals were persecuted during WWII in concentration camps.


PINK TRIANGLE — Color & shape given to gay/bisexual men in the concentration camps



Want to know more?

A Survivor’s Story — Read Here

Paragraph 175 — Read Here

Pink Triangle History — Read Here

(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here

Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 

Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here

Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship — Read Here

LGBTQ* Stories of Survival
“I’m living proof that Hitler didn’t win.
I’m aware of that every day.” The speaker is Friedrich-Paul von Groszheim. (pictured above) At the age of eighty-eight, this charming gay man celebrates his birthday twice a year. “You never know,” he says.
One can hardly imagine the suffering he endured. Von Groszheim was among 230 men arrested in Lübeck in the course of a single evening in 1937. The police hauled him from his home and imprisoned him for ten months. He was released, but re-arrested. This time, the Nazi authorities forced him to choose between castration, or incarceration at the concentration camp in Sachsenhausen. He submitted to castration.
His nightmare had not ended, however. In 1943, von Groszheim was arrested a third time, and was put into a satellite camp of Neuengamme. He survived that ordel, but half a century would have to pass before he started to tell his story.
— Dr. Klaus Müller
Introduction to THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE

LGBTQ* Stories of Survival

“I’m living proof that Hitler didn’t win.

I’m aware of that every day.” The speaker is Friedrich-Paul von Groszheim. (pictured above) At the age of eighty-eight, this charming gay man celebrates his birthday twice a year. “You never know,” he says.

One can hardly imagine the suffering he endured. Von Groszheim was among 230 men arrested in Lübeck in the course of a single evening in 1937. The police hauled him from his home and imprisoned him for ten months. He was released, but re-arrested. This time, the Nazi authorities forced him to choose between castration, or incarceration at the concentration camp in Sachsenhausen. He submitted to castration.

His nightmare had not ended, however. In 1943, von Groszheim was arrested a third time, and was put into a satellite camp of Neuengamme. He survived that ordel, but half a century would have to pass before he started to tell his story.

— Dr. Klaus Müller

Introduction to THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(and then what happened)
Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.
To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(and then what happened)

Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.

To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

Aug 7
LGBTQ* History
The Pink Triangle
* The Pink Triangle was a badge designated for gay/homosexual (male) prisoners in the Concentration Camps during World War II
—> Pink Triangles were considered the “lowest” / “most insignificant” prisoner
(Pink Triangles could be paired with other triangles, like the yellow triangle, marking a prisoner as gay and Jewish)
* It is estimated over 50,000 men were detained/sentenced to punishment for being homosexual from 1933-1945
—> Estimated 5,000 - 15,000 of those men were sent to concentration camps
—> There is no official record of how many of those prisoners would go on to perish in the camps
— The play/film BENT focuses on the Pink Triangles
*In the 1970s the Pink Triangle was adopted by the gay rights movement(s) as a symbol of solidarity and pride
—> Some people link the reclaiming of the Pink Triangle with the release of THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE (a memoir of survivor Heinz Heger)

LGBTQ* History

The Pink Triangle

* The Pink Triangle was a badge designated for gay/homosexual (male) prisoners in the Concentration Camps during World War II

—> Pink Triangles were considered the “lowest” / “most insignificant” prisoner

(Pink Triangles could be paired with other triangles, like the yellow triangle, marking a prisoner as gay and Jewish)

* It is estimated over 50,000 men were detained/sentenced to punishment for being homosexual from 1933-1945

—> Estimated 5,000 - 15,000 of those men were sent to concentration camps

—> There is no official record of how many of those prisoners would go on to perish in the camps

— The play/film BENT focuses on the Pink Triangles

*In the 1970s the Pink Triangle was adopted by the gay rights movement(s) as a symbol of solidarity and pride

—> Some people link the reclaiming of the Pink Triangle with the release of THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE (a memoir of survivor Heinz Heger)