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Posts tagged with "transgender"

KNOWhomo Repost:

Flags of Our Family

With flags being flown across the country, accompanied by dedicated voices, strength, and compassion, we provide a helpful history of some of the colors waving above our heads.

(for more information, check out #Flag)

knowhomo:

LBGTQ* Flag History

Transgender Flag

Left Photograph: (most widely recognized) Transgender Flag created by Monica Helms (1999).

*baby blue and pink to represent assigned gender colors; white to represent intersex and gender variant; pattern allows flag to be flown any way and remain the same (versatile to symbolize any path is the correct path)

Right Photograph: (alternative flag) Transgender Flag created by Jennifer Pellinen (2002).

* blue and pink to represent assigned genders; purple, lavender, and lilac to symbolize genders outside of male/female binary

LGBTQ* Playwrights You (Should) Know
And a Playwright’s Request
Christina Quintana
Plays:
The Next Thing; Evensong; Enter Your Sleep; 
Gumbo; Scissoring; The Gay Play; Blank Canvas
"The playwright, poet and essayist Cherríe Moraga once described art as “the expression of the deep soul that inspires collectivism and wards off the suicide of isolation.” With inspiration from every soul I come across and these words as my manifesto, my plays proclaim, “You are not alone.”​
A Playwright’s Request:
Hello Everyone, 
Rebecca, of KNOWhomo, here. Playwright extraordinaire and close friend, Christina Quintana, is starting a new project and is seeking out one-on-one time to conduct a series of interviews and coffee house conversations for her next production. 
She writes: 
“Friends, I’m very interested in developing a play/piece of theater specifically about the experiences of significant others of trans individuals. I am particularly looking at the role of identity in partnership, how that identity shifts, and the varying impacts, both positive and negative, on that partner. Like all my projects, the interview process is purely to gain truth, and for anyone who offers his/her time and stories, all will remain confidential.”
I have personally read many of Christina’s plays and am always humbled the dedication and talent she has for transforming individual stories into masterful works for hungry audiences. I can personally vouch for her charming spirit and sincere passion for creating safe spaces. 
If you are in the NYC area or are comfortable communicating and sharing your insight through online media, you can email her at: clquinta@gmail.com.
Thank you for considering being a part of this project. Please feel free  to tell her that you’re part of the amazing internet community and family we have made.
And as always,
Keep On, Keeping On! 
Rebecca, creator and co-moderator of KNOWhomo.tumblr

LGBTQ* Playwrights You (Should) Know

And a Playwright’s Request

Christina Quintana

Plays:

The Next Thing; Evensong; Enter Your Sleep;

Gumbo; Scissoring; The Gay Play; Blank Canvas

"The playwright, poet and essayist Cherríe Moraga once described art as “the expression of the deep soul that inspires collectivism and wards off the suicide of isolation.” With inspiration from every soul I come across and these words as my manifesto, my plays proclaim, “You are not alone.”​

A Playwright’s Request:

Hello Everyone, 

Rebecca, of KNOWhomo, here. Playwright extraordinaire and close friend, Christina Quintana, is starting a new project and is seeking out one-on-one time to conduct a series of interviews and coffee house conversations for her next production. 

She writes:

Friends, I’m very interested in developing a play/piece of theater specifically about the experiences of significant others of trans individuals. I am particularly looking at the role of identity in partnership, how that identity shifts, and the varying impacts, both positive and negative, on that partner. Like all my projects, the interview process is purely to gain truth, and for anyone who offers his/her time and stories, all will remain confidential.”

I have personally read many of Christina’s plays and am always humbled the dedication and talent she has for transforming individual stories into masterful works for hungry audiences. I can personally vouch for her charming spirit and sincere passion for creating safe spaces. 

If you are in the NYC area or are comfortable communicating and sharing your insight through online media, you can email her at: clquinta@gmail.com.

Thank you for considering being a part of this project. Please feel free  to tell her that you’re part of the amazing internet community and family we have made.

And as always,

Keep On, Keeping On! 

Rebecca, creator and co-moderator of KNOWhomo.tumblr

Alan L. Hart
SYMIHC

Podcasts You May Have Missed:

Alan L. Hart  from Stuff You Missed In History Class

Following from Missed In History:

Alan L. Hart was a novelist and a doctor who did groundbreaking work in the world of public health and tuberculosis detection. He was also one of the first people in the United States to undergo surgery as part of transitioning to a different gender than the one to which he had been born. His gender and sexual orientation influenced both his writing and his career. After his transition, he faced extensive discrimination and harassment: For much of his life, he had to move from place to place after colleagues discovered that he had been born female.

Previous KNOWhomo post about Dr. J. Allen Gilbert can be read HERE

NOTE: Some of the language may cause triggers. I  highly recommend listening to Tracy and Holly speak at the end of the podcast. Missed in History works diligently on their research. Language is incredibly complicated and it is quite clear in their discussion that their intention is to be P.C. and inclusive. This may be a bit problematic to some listeners at times, due to language/phrasing used. Please remember we are all learning together and the Stuff You Missed team is very receptive to insightful, polite responses.

I’ve heard parents say all they want is “the best” for their children, but the best is subjective and anchored by how they know and learned the world.

- excerpt from Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More by Janet Mock (via queerbetweenthelines)

LGBTQ* Conferences You May Have Missed:

International Trans Women of Colour Gathering at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit, MI

The gathering is all set to take place on June 19th, 2014. It’s being coordinated by Lexi Adsit, b. binaohan, micha cardenas, Askari Gonzalez, and Sam Andazola. 

From the organizers (via “about” on their awesome Tumblr page):

"This network gathering will seek to connect diverse and dispersed trans women of colour so that we can begin to build the bridges, networks, and resources necessary to transform our communities using media and technology. Our network gathering will focus on sharing wisdom and skills between the Trans Women of Colour already living/working/existing on the front lines through a combination of workshops, skill shares, and networking activities. We hope that all of the people involved will walk away with not only the knowledge and connections needed to make change in their own communities, but with an international network of Trans Women of Colour that will aid us all in creating real and lasting change.

Trans Women of Colour exist at an intersection of oppression that has resulted in our high levels of poverty, unemployment, incarceration, death (Black and/or Latina trans women make the majority of names on the global Trans Day of Remembrance list), among other serious problems too numerous to name.

While we have intentionally chosen to use ‘Trans Women of Colour’ this Network Gathering is inclusive of non-binary trans feminine people of colour as well, which includes, but isn’t limited to, people of colour who identify as bakla, hijra, fa’fafine, third gender, genderqueer, provided that they/we understand that this gathering will focus on and centre the most vulnerable in our community — Black, Indigenous, and/or Latina trans women, binary or not, sex workers, incarcerated people, disabled people, immigrants.”

If you’d like to attend, check out more info HERE.

If you’d like to show some support, check out more info HERE.

<3 Ruth Elizabeth

Facebook News We’re Following, Pt. 2

Facebook.com officially launched their “Custom Gender” option, along with “Pronoun Preference” today. 

(Part 1, HERE)

KNOWhomo Throw Back Thursday
On todays date, in 1953, Christine Jorgensen returned to New York following the first internationally recognized sex reassignment surgery, performed by Dr. Christian Hamburger
knowhomo:

LGBTQ* People You Should Know
Christine Jorgensen (May 30, 1926 – May 3, 1989) 
Jorgensen was the first transgender individual to gain wide press and conduct interviews following sexual reassignment surgery (SRS)
 ***Note, Jorgensen&#8217;s SRS was not the first. It was the first to gain international attention.***
 While serving in the army in 1945, Jorgensen found supportive surgeons and endocrinologists while in Copenhagen
During this time, sexual reassignment surgery was illegal in many countries
America had no known surgery available
Jorgensen’s surgery was front page news in 1952 (making the headline of New York Daily News reading “Ex-GI Becomes Blonde Beauty.”)
                      
Jorgensen, after returning to America, became close to Dr. Harry Benjamin, who would go on to oversee much of her physical transition later in life
 During the course of her life, Jorgensen became an advocate and voice for the transgender community. 
 

KNOWhomo Throw Back Thursday

On todays date, in 1953, Christine Jorgensen returned to New York following the first internationally recognized sex reassignment surgery, performed by Dr. Christian Hamburger

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* People You Should Know

Christine Jorgensen (May 30, 1926 – May 3, 1989) 

  • Jorgensen was the first transgender individual to gain wide press and conduct interviews following sexual reassignment surgery (SRS)

 ***Note, Jorgensen’s SRS was not the first. It was the first to gain international attention.***

  •  While serving in the army in 1945, Jorgensen found supportive surgeons and endocrinologists while in Copenhagen
  • During this time, sexual reassignment surgery was illegal in many countries
  • America had no known surgery available
  • Jorgensen’s surgery was front page news in 1952 (making the headline of New York Daily News reading “Ex-GI Becomes Blonde Beauty.”)

                      blonde

  • Jorgensen, after returning to America, became close to Dr. Harry Benjamin, who would go on to oversee much of her physical transition later in life
  •  During the course of her life, Jorgensen became an advocate and voice for the transgender community. 

 

LGBTQ* Ally Cookies and Ally Rules

Dear Piers Morgan: How To Be An Ally 

from GayWrites.org’s creator, Camille.

Camille, the creator and moderator of Tumblr’s GayWrites as well as AskGayWrites, is a site you I (Rebecca) will stand up for as one of my favorites on Tumblr. It is well sourced, researched, and like many blogs, Camille puts endless hours of her own time into the large project that is GayWrites.org.

Check her out! And, If you feel inclined, subscribe to her YouTube Channel.

LGBTQ* News On Our Radar

Pamela Raintree and ‘Stone the Vote’

Pamela (to Shreveport Councilman Ron Webb): Leviticus 20:13 states, ‘If a man also lie with mankind as he lieth with a woman, they shall surely put him to death’,I brought the first stone, Mr. Webb, in case that your Bible talk isn’t just a smoke screen for personal prejudices.

Video from KMSS of Shreveport, Fox 33.

Personal Response:

*screams of full support* GO, PAM!

This beautiful, intelligent, and driven woman is a good friend of mine. Pamela Raintree has a special spot in my heart. She was the first person to speak to my parents when they attended their first PFLAG meeting with me. She is a talented artist. A loving friend. A compassionate neighbor. And just one hell of a woman. 

We know that Pamela Raintree has been blowing up Tumblr but I wanted to keep the conversation going. Stone the Vote, Pam. And as always -

Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca, creator and co-moderator of KNOWhomo.tumblr

KNOWhomo Reblogs: 

With the twentieth anniversary of Brandon Teena’s death tomorrow, the KNOWhomo team realizes how far we all still have to go to educated ourselves about the Trans* community and create a safe world for all of our fellow neighbors. One way we can do this is by exposing/researching narratives other than our own.

Keep On Learning/Sharing,

-Rebecca

knowhomo:

Quintessential Movies from the Trans* Film Canon You Should Know

*Please note: All language is taken from press releases/movie information/film write ups. Some language may seem problematic. The films are presented to a mass audience with the descriptions below.
  1. Ma Vie En Rose (My Life in Pink) — story of a young MAAB child and her expression 
  2. Hedwig and the Angry Inch — Transexual punk rocker Hedwig leads us through her life, Eastern Europe, mega-stardom, and love in this rock opera
  3. Boys Don’t Cry — biopic about Brandon Teena and the final days of his life
  4. Beautiful Boxer — biopic story of Nong Thoom (born  Parinya Kiatbusaba), a famous kathoey, Muay Thai fighter, actress and model. 
  5. Soldier’s Girl — biopic about Barry Winchell, his relationship with Calpernia Addams, and the events of his fellow soldiers
  6. Breakfast on Pluto — follows the life of Patrick “Kitten” Braden in the fictional Irish town of  Tyrellin in the 1940s
  7. Orlando — based on V. Woolf’s novel of the same name, this film follow the forever young Orlando through life (an all it’s incarnations)
  8. Transamerica — follows Bree as she travels cross-country with her son 
  9. The Adventures of Sebastian Cole — Sebastian returns to the US to reunite with his father after his sexual reassignment surgery 
  10.  20 centímetros (20 Centimeters)— Spanish film following a woman as she works towards surgery to fix her “20 centimeters of problems”

Trans* Person in History Everyone Should Know?

GO!

(your response may be used in the very near future)

LGBTQ* Theatre Blog You May Have Missed: "Don't Call Me Ma'am: On the Politics of Trans Casting" by MJ Kaufman

I think that casting trans actors in trans roles is important not only because we need to make our bodies visible, but because many transpeople’s lives are materially impacted by transphobia. ….” 

Read More HERE

Sunny Florida

I’m sitting here watching the season finale of Bones (before it expires in 4 hours), scrambling to finish packing, to update my iPod, to make sure I have Kafka on the Shore because it is one of my favorite plane reads. Tomorrow, I leave for Florida and top surgery. It hasn’t quite hit me yet beyond the realization that at this point, I’m probably not going to get any sleep. Too much to do.

This summer, I have taken a lot of time for me. I’ve moved in leaps in my transition, spent days at the barn or the lake, slept in parking lots to go to Six Flags or to the doctor the next morning, went to my first music festival followed by a random trip to the state capital just because I wanted my partner to see the science museum. I haven’t watched television, haven’t touched my computer more than once a week, haven’t spent a day indoors unless it was raining. And I have been happy. 

After a lot of debate with myself and discussions with my friends and people I know who have been on T, I started T. I have Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and I wondered what affect it could have (if anyone else has any experiences with T and PCOS, I’d love to hear about it). But after discussions with my endocrinologist about diet and exercise and what PCOS means to me, I decided I wanted to start with careful supervision. I have also been working hard to run or hike six days a week and keep my diet low in red meats and high in fruits and vegetables. And I love it. I love running on the trails by the lake or on the loop around campus before work. 

I’ll be updating y’all about what all is entailed in the pre-op, post-op, and my impressions of Fort Lauderdale, so keep an eye out. And if you have any questions for me, just ask.

-Cael

LGBTQ* Artists and Photographers You Should Keep On Your Radar

Photographer REBECCA SWAN

Queer artist Rebecca Swan from Aotearoa, New Zealand reexamines gender and the way the body is captured through a photography. Many of the individuals who share their bodies with Swan’s camera identify outside of the gender binary, including many members of the trans* community. Swan’s book ASSUME NOTHING follows twenty five people as they pose, expose, and share their most intimate truths with the camera. 

Photo Sources

1. Source — “Dred”

2. Souce

3. Source — Rebecca Swan, Photographer

4. Source — “Reshma Valliappan”

5. Source — “Mark”

6. Source — “Shane”

7. Source — “Merge”

KNOWhomo's Posts Worth Repeating:

LGBTQ* Insight, Education and Ally Conversations
From Oregon State
— Roommate Questions/Answers
(You may want to pass this on to RAs in conversation)
Questions for Roomates
In the residence halls In a residence hall environment, we interact daily with a wide variety of people. Statistics have shown that at least 10% of the general population consider themselves to be lesbian or gay, and many more consider themselves to be bisexual. It is very likely that you will meet individuals who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) during your time at OSU. This page was developed to hopefully answer some of the questions you may have. Remember, you may ask these questions of your Residence Life staff as well.
Why do they flaunt their sexuality? “What people do in their own bedrooms is their own business, but I saw two guys walking across campus holding hands.”
One of the worst forms of oppression for a human being is to be denied emotional expression. Curiously, it is called “expressing love” when heterosexuals hold hands, but “flaunting” when LGBT people express their love. How would heterosexuals react if they could not hold hands, kiss, dance together, go to romantic dinners, or be married? LGBT people who are open with their affections are not trying to shock others, but are just doing what is natural to them and others.
What should I do if a friend tells me that he or she is gay? What does that say about me? Most LGBT people who “come out” would like the same sincere acceptance and encouragement you might want when you tell a friend something special about yourself. Because of many people’s “homophobic” attitude (fear and derision of same sex relationships), many gays are afraid of rejection from their friends. You might first honestly ask yourself how you feel about this news and then discuss it as a caring friend.
Some people who find out a close friend is LGBT wonder “What does that mean about me?” This is a natural reaction. What it probably means is that your friend trusts you very much. However, liking someone gay does not make you gay any more than liking someone smart makes you smart.
If my roommate “comes out” to me, does that mean that he or she thinks that I’m gay too? There is a big difference between “coming out” and “coming on.” As discussed above, most gay people who come out want to be accepted, not hassled. Sometimes a gay person might “come on” to you, tell you they are attracted to you, or want an intimate relationship with you. You can handle it in the same manner that you would handle a heterosexual approach. Gay love is as serious and legitimate as heterosexual love. Again, you should discuss it with your friend.
If I accept my LGBT roommate, will he or she bring in lots of LGBT friends and push me out? A formerly taboo subject will be out in the open. You may feel uncomfortable from a lack of experience dealing with gay people who are not “closeted.” The LGBT friends should respect non-LGBT people just as LGBT people expect to be respected. Visits by LGBT folks are a good opportunity to learn about this large and diverse segment of the population. However, be cautious about presuming that all your roommate’s friends are LGBT. His or her best friends may be straight.
Won’t my friends or parents think I’m gay if I have a gay roommate or friend or defend equal rights? Defending equal rights for gays is often a courageous stance to take. Some people may conclude that such a person has a vested interest to do so. It is up to you whether you feel that the people you are defending are worth the risk of occasional accusations or assumptions by others. Remember that a word from heterosexual friends and allies in defense or support of gay rights can go a long way to help change people’s minds.
Now that I know my roommate is gay, I don’t feel comfortable about nudity, dressing, showering, etc. More than likely, you have been living together long enough to trust each other. There is no reason for the trust to diminish now. Your roommate has been gay or lesbian all along! Bear in mind that gays are not always comfortable with non-gays, either. Gay people, just like straight people, are attracted to certain types of folks. Most gays and lesbians are not sexually interested in heterosexuals, just as the reverse is true.

KNOWhomo's Posts Worth Repeating:

LGBTQ* Insight, Education and Ally Conversations

From Oregon State

— Roommate Questions/Answers

(You may want to pass this on to RAs in conversation)

Questions for Roomates

In the residence halls 
In a residence hall environment, we interact daily with a wide variety of people. Statistics have shown that at least 10% of the general population consider themselves to be lesbian or gay, and many more consider themselves to be bisexual. It is very likely that you will meet individuals who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) during your time at OSU. This page was developed to hopefully answer some of the questions you may have. Remember, you may ask these questions of your Residence Life staff as well.

Why do they flaunt their sexuality? 
“What people do in their own bedrooms is their own business, but I saw two guys walking across campus holding hands.”

One of the worst forms of oppression for a human being is to be denied emotional expression. Curiously, it is called “expressing love” when heterosexuals hold hands, but “flaunting” when LGBT people express their love. How would heterosexuals react if they could not hold hands, kiss, dance together, go to romantic dinners, or be married? LGBT people who are open with their affections are not trying to shock others, but are just doing what is natural to them and others.

What should I do if a friend tells me that he or she is gay? What does that say about me? 
Most LGBT people who “come out” would like the same sincere acceptance and encouragement you might want when you tell a friend something special about yourself. Because of many people’s “homophobic” attitude (fear and derision of same sex relationships), many gays are afraid of rejection from their friends. You might first honestly ask yourself how you feel about this news and then discuss it as a caring friend.

Some people who find out a close friend is LGBT wonder “What does that mean about me?” This is a natural reaction. What it probably means is that your friend trusts you very much. However, liking someone gay does not make you gay any more than liking someone smart makes you smart.

If my roommate “comes out” to me, does that mean that he or she thinks that I’m gay too? 
There is a big difference between “coming out” and “coming on.” As discussed above, most gay people who come out want to be accepted, not hassled. Sometimes a gay person might “come on” to you, tell you they are attracted to you, or want an intimate relationship with you. You can handle it in the same manner that you would handle a heterosexual approach. Gay love is as serious and legitimate as heterosexual love. Again, you should discuss it with your friend.

If I accept my LGBT roommate, will he or she bring in lots of LGBT friends and push me out? 
A formerly taboo subject will be out in the open. You may feel uncomfortable from a lack of experience dealing with gay people who are not “closeted.” The LGBT friends should respect non-LGBT people just as LGBT people expect to be respected. Visits by LGBT folks are a good opportunity to learn about this large and diverse segment of the population. However, be cautious about presuming that all your roommate’s friends are LGBT. His or her best friends may be straight.

Won’t my friends or parents think I’m gay if I have a gay roommate or friend or defend equal rights? 
Defending equal rights for gays is often a courageous stance to take. Some people may conclude that such a person has a vested interest to do so. It is up to you whether you feel that the people you are defending are worth the risk of occasional accusations or assumptions by others. Remember that a word from heterosexual friends and allies in defense or support of gay rights can go a long way to help change people’s minds.

Now that I know my roommate is gay, I don’t feel comfortable about nudity, dressing, showering, etc. 
More than likely, you have been living together long enough to trust each other. There is no reason for the trust to diminish now. Your roommate has been gay or lesbian all along! Bear in mind that gays are not always comfortable with non-gays, either. Gay people, just like straight people, are attracted to certain types of folks. Most gays and lesbians are not sexually interested in heterosexuals, just as the reverse is true.