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Posts tagged with "san francisco"

LGBTQ* Off-Topic History
Outlawing Cross-Dressing
Anti-cross-dressing laws were passed heavily in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century.
Following text from: Transgender History by Susan Stryker
San Francisco’s 1863 Ordinance:
If any person shall appear in a public place in a state of nudity, or in a dress not belonging to his or her sex, or in an indecent or lewd dress, or shall make any indecent exposure of his or her person, or be found guilty of any lewd or indecent act or behavior, or shall exhibit or perform any indecent, immoral or lewd play, or other representation, he should be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall pay a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars.
$500.00 (1863) = $8805 (2010 - estimated)

  Conversion based on $1.00 (2010) = $17.61 (1863)
  portrait: Francis Martin Drexel (1792-1863) Double Portrait 1822 

LGBTQ* Off-Topic History

Outlawing Cross-Dressing

Anti-cross-dressing laws were passed heavily in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century.

Following text from: Transgender History by Susan Stryker

San Francisco’s 1863 Ordinance:

If any person shall appear in a public place in a state of nudity, or in a dress not belonging to his or her sex, or in an indecent or lewd dress, or shall make any indecent exposure of his or her person, or be found guilty of any lewd or indecent act or behavior, or shall exhibit or perform any indecent, immoral or lewd play, or other representation, he should be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall pay a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars.

$500.00 (1863) = $8805 (2010 - estimated)

  Conversion based on $1.00 (2010) = $17.61 (1863)

  portrait: Francis Martin Drexel (1792-1863) Double Portrait 1822 

LGBTQ* Shows On Our Radar

HBO’S LOOKING

(above is the entire first episode, featured on HBO’s Youtube Page)

From HBO.com: 

'Looking' offers up the unfiltered experiences of three close friends living — and loving — in modern-day San Francisco. Friendship may bind them, but each is at a markedly different point in his journey: Patrick (Jonathan Groff) is the 29-year-old video game designer getting back into the dating world in the wake of his ex's engagement; aspiring artist Agustín (Frankie J. Alvarez), 31, is questioning the idea of monogamy amid a move to domesticate with his boyfriend; and the group's oldest member — longtime waiter Dom (Murray Bartlett), 39 — is facing middle age with romantic and professional dreams still unfulfilled.

The trio’s stories intertwine and unspool dramatically as they search for happiness and intimacy in an age of unparalleled choices — and rights — for gay men. Also important to the ‘Looking’ mix is the progressive, unpredictable, sexually open culture of the Bay Area, with real San Francisco locations serving as a backdrop for the group’s lives. Rounding out the ‘Looking’ world are a bevy of dynamic gay men including Kevin (Russell Tovey), Lynn (Scott Bakula), and Richie (Raul Castillo), as well as a wide-range of supporting characters like Dom’s roommate Doris (Lauren Weedman), Agustín’s boyfriend Frank (O.T. Fagbenle), and Patrick’s co-worker Owen (Andrew Law).

'Looking' was created by Michael Lannan and is executive produced by Sarah Condon ('Bored to Death') and Andrew Haigh, who wrote and directed the critically-lauded 'Weekend.'

Personal Thoughts:

Last night our apartment watched the first episode of LOOKING. We were stoked. In a post-Queer As Folk America, with same-sex marriage in some states, federal protections in a few more, and a changing landscape for the LGBTQ* community, LOOKING gave a new television consumer perspective to what it means to ‘be gay in America.’ It is refreshing to see a show that highlights a community that is often left to documentaries or characters created to be the cis-female’s best friend. LOOKING also gives ample screen time, smart dialogue, and attention to characters of color. (Good job, HBO!) I am crossing my fingers that this continues.

The KNOWhomo apartment in the District of Columbia found it honest, true, well-paced, and sincere. Jonathan Groff’s ‘Patrick’ is quirky and far too easy to relate to during his OK Cupid blind date. I may have actually cringed a few times, projecting my own dating history into his awkwardness.

Should you have time (about a half an hour), check out the first episode of LOOKING. Remember, in order to have shows like LOOKING on the air, there must be an audience who supports it.

Here’s to many seasons to come.

HBO, Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca, creator and co-moderator of KNOWhomo.tumblr

Did you watch the first episode? What did you think?

Nov 1
LGBTQ* Firsts and People You Should Know
Mary C. Morgan 
Judge Morgan was appointed on 26 August 1981, in San Francisco, by Governor Jerry Brown. She was the FIRST openly lesbian judge in the United States.

LGBTQ* Firsts and People You Should Know

Mary C. Morgan 

Judge Morgan was appointed on 26 August 1981, in San Francisco, by Governor Jerry Brown. She was the FIRST openly lesbian judge in the United States.

Aug 5

LGBTQ* Comic Books & Graphic Art You Might Have Missed

how loathsome (2003)by Ted Naifeh and Tristan Crane

Comic Genre: Goth, LGBT, Gender

**Warning: Language, Sexual Discussions, Drug Use**

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, HARVEY MILK.

(May 22, 1930)

"Somewhere in Des Moines or San Antonio there is a young gay person who all of a sudden realizes that he or she is gay; knows that if their parents find out they will be tossed out of the house, their classmates will taunt the child, and the Anita Bryant’s and John Briggs’ are doing their part on TV.
And that child has several options: staying in the closet, and suicide. And then one day that child might open the paper that says ‘Homosexual elected in San Francisco’ and there are two new options: the option is to go to California, or stay in San Antonio and fight. Two days after I was elected I got a phone call and the voice was quite young. It was from Altoona, Pennsylvania. And the person said ‘Thanks’.

And you’ve got to elect gay people; so that thousands upon thousands like that child know that there is hope for a better world; there is hope for a better tomorrow. Without hope, not only gays, but those who are blacks, the Asians, the disabled, the seniors, the us’s; without hope the us’s give up.
I know that you can’t live on hope alone, but without it, life is not worth living. And you, and you, and you, and you have got to give them hope.” 

LGBTQ* History and Clubs You Should Know
 Mona’s 440 in San Francisco, Ca.
Mona’s 440 was the FIRST lesbian bar in America, opening in 1938.
Bartenders wore tuxes and suits and patrons would often be said to be “dressed the part” (referring to a butch/femme persona).

LGBTQ* History and Clubs You Should Know

 Mona’s 440 in San Francisco, Ca.

Mona’s 440 was the FIRST lesbian bar in America, opening in 1938.

Bartenders wore tuxes and suits and patrons would often be said to be “dressed the part” (referring to a butch/femme persona).

LGBTQ* History Through Photography

National March for Lesbian/Gay Rights. National Gay Liberation Day. July 15th, 1984, San Francisco, the day before the National Democratic Convention in San Francisco.

Photographer I. Hartmann’s Page

LGBTQ* History Through Photography

National March for Lesbian/Gay Rights. National Gay Liberation Day. July 15th, 1984, San Francisco, the day before the National Democratic Convention in San Francisco.


Photographer I. Hartmann’s Page

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(And Probably Never Heard Of)

Homo History and the Prisoner of Alcatraz
Alcatraz,  San Francisco Bay’s “Rock,” opened as a prison in the 1934. The prison, considered the most intense maximum-security facility in the United States, housed the most “dangerous and incorrigible” criminals in the country. Murderers, mob bosses, serial murderers and enemies of the state were sent to Alcatraz. Also incarcerated at the mighty prison where men who committed the punishable crime of sodomy.
Frank Bolt (pictured above) was Alcatraz’s first inmate, processed on July 1, 1934. Bolt was convicted and imprisoned on the charge of being caught in a homosexual act and received a five-year sentence for acts of sodomy. He would later die at Alcatraz.
-Nine of the first twenty-five prisoners processed and housed at Alcatraz were jailed on charges of sodomy.
Source: The Portable Queer: Homo History p.25-26

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(And Probably Never Heard Of)

Homo History and the Prisoner of Alcatraz

Alcatraz,  San Francisco Bay’s “Rock,” opened as a prison in the 1934. The prison, considered the most intense maximum-security facility in the United States, housed the most “dangerous and incorrigible” criminals in the country. Murderers, mob bosses, serial murderers and enemies of the state were sent to Alcatraz. Also incarcerated at the mighty prison where men who committed the punishable crime of sodomy.

Frank Bolt (pictured above) was Alcatraz’s first inmate, processed on July 1, 1934. Bolt was convicted and imprisoned on the charge of being caught in a homosexual act and received a five-year sentence for acts of sodomy. He would later die at Alcatraz.

-Nine of the first twenty-five prisoners processed and housed at Alcatraz were jailed on charges of sodomy.

Source: The Portable Queer: Homo History p.25-26

Sep 9
Photographer and Subjects Unknown
Taken in San Francisco in the 1980s.

—from the documentary We Were Here  about the early days of HIV/AIDS in the U.S.A. 

Photographer and Subjects Unknown

Taken in San Francisco in the 1980s.

—from the documentary We Were Here  about the early days of HIV/AIDS in the U.S.A. 

Quote from a flyer (S.F. Gay History Project 1979)

Quote from a flyer (S.F. Gay History Project 1979)

LGBTQ* Odd/Off-Topic History
Outlawing Cross-Dressing
Anti-cross-dressing laws passed heavily in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century.
San Francisco’s 1863 Ordinance:
If any person shall appear in a public place in a state of nudity, or in a dress not belonging to his or her sex, or in an indecent or lewd dress, or shall make any indecent exposure of his or her person, or be found guilty of any lewd or indecent act or behavior, or shall exhibit or perform any indecent, immoral or lewd play, or other representation, he should be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall pay a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars.
$500.00 (1863) = $8805 (2010 - estimated)
( text: Susan Stryker Transgender History
   Conversion based on 1863 holding a $17.61 = $1.00 (2010)
  portrait: Francis Martin Drexel (1792-1863) Double Portrait 1822 )

LGBTQ* Odd/Off-Topic History

Outlawing Cross-Dressing

Anti-cross-dressing laws passed heavily in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century.

San Francisco’s 1863 Ordinance:

If any person shall appear in a public place in a state of nudity, or in a dress not belonging to his or her sex, or in an indecent or lewd dress, or shall make any indecent exposure of his or her person, or be found guilty of any lewd or indecent act or behavior, or shall exhibit or perform any indecent, immoral or lewd play, or other representation, he should be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall pay a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars.

$500.00 (1863) = $8805 (2010 - estimated)

( text: Susan Stryker Transgender History

   Conversion based on 1863 holding a $17.61 = $1.00 (2010)

  portrait: Francis Martin Drexel (1792-1863) Double Portrait 1822 )

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(And Probably Never Heard Of)
— Compton Cafeteria Riots 1966 
"One weekend night in August — the precise date unknown — Compton’s, a twenty-four-hour cafeteria, was buzzing with its usual late-night crowd of drag queens, hustlers, slummers, cruisers, runaway teens, and down-and-out neighborhood regulars. The restaurant’s manager became annoyed by a noisy young crowd of queens at one table who seemed to be spending a lot of time without spending a lot of money, and called in the police to roust them — as it had been  doing with increasing frequency throughout the summer.
A surly police officer …. grabbed the arm of one of the queens and tried to drag her away. She unexpectedly threw her coffee in his face, however, and melee erupted…. The paddy wagons arrived and the street fighting broke out in Compton’s vicinity.”
Text from: Stryker, Susan. Transgender History. Berkeley, CA: Seal, 2008. P. 64

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(And Probably Never Heard Of)

— Compton Cafeteria Riots 1966 

"One weekend night in August — the precise date unknown — Compton’s, a twenty-four-hour cafeteria, was buzzing with its usual late-night crowd of drag queens, hustlers, slummers, cruisers, runaway teens, and down-and-out neighborhood regulars. The restaurant’s manager became annoyed by a noisy young crowd of queens at one table who seemed to be spending a lot of time without spending a lot of money, and called in the police to roust them — as it had been  doing with increasing frequency throughout the summer.

A surly police officer …. grabbed the arm of one of the queens and tried to drag her away. She unexpectedly threw her coffee in his face, however, and melee erupted…. The paddy wagons arrived and the street fighting broke out in Compton’s vicinity.”

Text from: Stryker, Susan. Transgender History. Berkeley, CA: Seal, 2008. P. 64

compton cafe

The first “PRIDE” flag is rumored to have started with San Francisco Pride in the 1970’s.
Above are the original 8 colors which made up the flag and their meaning.

The first “PRIDE” flag is rumored to have started with San Francisco Pride in the 1970’s.

Above are the original 8 colors which made up the flag and their meaning.