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Posts tagged with "pink triangle"

Oct 8

LGBTQ* Podcasts You May Have Missed

Stuff You Missed in History Class, from How Stuff W?rks, is a wonderful source for information about LGBTQ* culture. In the last year, they did the podcast “Who Wore the Pink Triangle,” and even covered a gay man who may have been the inspiration for Indiana Jones.

Should you find yourself with time, check out their podcast on iTunes or on HowStuffWorks.com. They also have an app!

Interested in Pink Triangle History?

Want to know more?

A Survivor’s Story — Read Here

Paragraph 175 — Read Here

Pink Triangle History — Read Here

(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here

Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 

Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here

Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship — Read Here

Oct 5

LGBTQ* Memorials, Plaques and History

Gay Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Germany

Above is the short film footage played on a loop inside the Gay Holocaust Memorial in Berlin.

Opened in 2008 - the memorial recognizes the 55,000 men held in concentration camps for “crimes against the state” and “crimes against nature” (as stated in Germany’s Paragraph 175). It is approximated that 15,000 of these men were executed in the concentration camps.

image

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(and then what happened)
Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.
To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.
Would you like to know more? Check out:
#History You Should Know 
#Black/African American 
#Pink Triangle History 
#Flag(s) History 
#Military/Armed Forces 
#Vintage 
#Christian 
#Jewish 
#Muslim 
 

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(and then what happened)

Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.

To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.

Would you like to know more? Check out:

#History You Should Know 

#Black/African American 

#Pink Triangle History 

#Flag(s) History 

#Military/Armed Forces 

#Vintage 

#Christian 

#Jewish 

#Muslim 

 

Jan 3

LGBTQ* Blast From The Past: 

Our Bodies, Ourselves for the New Century

Originally published by the Boston Women’s Health Collective in 1984, the text offers an entire chapter devoted to “Relationships with Women.” Pictured above from page 209 (1998 edition) is a column on women interested in meeting other women for romantic relationships in rural areas.

(Please note, the material showcased in this post is 15+ years old. The language, when compared to today’s language, is problematic. At the time of this printing in 1998, the language was believed to be politically correct. Our Bodies, Ourselves was considered one of the leading collectives for wom(y/e)n and LBT individuals at that time.)

LGBTQ* Podcasts You May Have Missed

Stuff You Missed in History Class, from How Stuff W?rks, is a wonderful source for information about LGBTQ* culture. In the last year, they did the podcast “Who Wore the Pink Triangle,” and even covered a gay man who may have been the inspiration for Indiana Jones.

Should you find yourself with time, check out their podcast on iTunes or on HowStuffWorks.com. They also have an app!

Interested in Pink Triangle History?

Want to know more?

A Survivor’s Story — Read Here

Paragraph 175 — Read Here

Pink Triangle History — Read Here

(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here

Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 

Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here

Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship — Read Here

LGBTQ* KNOWhomo History Posts You May Have Missed

Gay (identified cis-)Men in History

(all posts can be found under the #history hashtag on the right side — click name to link to past post)

LGBTQ* History In The News
Pride Month News You Should Know
(the following text from JPost.com)
Last gay Jewish Holocaust survivor dies
By BENJAMIN WEINTHAL, 
Gad Beck, a resistance fighter during World War II, passes away in Berlin days before his 89th birthday
BERLIN – Gad Beck, an anti-Nazi Zionist resistance fighter and the last known gay Jewish survivor of the Holocaust, died on Sunday in Berlin. He passed away in a senior citizens’ home six days before his 89th birthday, which would have been on June 30.Beck was a pioneering gay activist and educator in a severely anti-homosexual, repressive post-World War II German society. He was famous for his witty, lively style of speaking.On a German talk show, he said, “The Americans in New Yorkcalled me a great hero. I said no… I’m really a little hero.”Perhaps the single most important experience that shaped his life was the wartime effort to rescue his boyfriend. Beck donned a Hitler Youth uniform and entered a deportation center to free his Jewish lover Manfred Lewin, who had declined to separate himself from his family.The Nazis would later deport the entire Lewin family to Auschwitz, where they were murdered.Speaking about his life as a gay Jew, Beck invoked a line frequently cited about homosexuality: “God doesn’t punish for a life of love.”
Read more HERE

For more KNOWhomo posts on the Pink Triangle/gay Holocaust persecution:

A Survivor’s Story — Read Here
Paragraph 175 — Read Here
Pink Triangle History — Read Here
(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here
Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 
Photo Blog Series — Look Here
Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here
Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship —Read Here

LGBTQ* History In The News

Pride Month News You Should Know


(the following text from JPost.com)

Last gay Jewish Holocaust survivor dies

Gad Beck, a resistance fighter during World War II, passes away in Berlin days before his 89th birthday

BERLIN – Gad Beck, an anti-Nazi Zionist resistance fighter and the last known gay Jewish survivor of the Holocaust, died on Sunday in Berlin. He passed away in a senior citizens’ home six days before his 89th birthday, which would have been on June 30.

Beck was a pioneering gay activist and educator in a severely anti-homosexual, repressive post-World War II German society. He was famous for his witty, lively style of speaking.

On a German talk show, he said, “The Americans in New Yorkcalled me a great hero. I said no… I’m really a little hero.”

Perhaps the single most important experience that shaped his life was the wartime effort to rescue his boyfriend. Beck donned a Hitler Youth uniform and entered a deportation center to free his Jewish lover Manfred Lewin, who had declined to separate himself from his family.

The Nazis would later deport the entire Lewin family to Auschwitz, where they were murdered.

Speaking about his life as a gay Jew, Beck invoked a line frequently cited about homosexuality: “God doesn’t punish for a life of love.”

Read more HERE


For more KNOWhomo posts on the Pink Triangle/gay Holocaust persecution:


A Survivor’s Story — Read Here

Paragraph 175 — Read Here

Pink Triangle History — Read Here

(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here

Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 

Photo Blog Series — Look Here

Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here

Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship —Read Here

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

Paragraph 175 & Pink Triangle History

PARAGRAPH 175 — German Criminal Code

May 1871 - March 1994. From 1871 - 1994, over 130,000 men were held/charged with violation of Paragraph 175. For 123 years, this code criminalized homosexual acts between two men in Germany. It was with this law that homosexuals were persecuted during WWII in concentration camps.


PINK TRIANGLE — Color & shape given to gay/bisexual men in the concentration camps



Want to know more?

A Survivor’s Story — Read Here

Paragraph 175 — Read Here

Pink Triangle History — Read Here

(Upsetting) Post-Camp History — Read Here

Pink Triangle Memorial — Read Here 

Theatre/Play about Pink Triangles: Bent — Read Here

Graphic Novel, including a Hitler Youth Homosexual Relationship — Read Here

LGBTQ* Documentaries You Should Know

  1.  Before Stonewall/After Stonewall (2 separate documentaries, now packaged together)
  2. A Jihad for Love
  3. Through My Eyes
  4. The Life and Times of Harvey Milk
  5. Two Spirits
  6. The Celluloid Closet
  7. Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
  8. Paragraph 175
  9. Paris is Burning
  10. Southern Comfort
LGBTQ* Stories of Survival
“I’m living proof that Hitler didn’t win.
I’m aware of that every day.” The speaker is Friedrich-Paul von Groszheim. (pictured above) At the age of eighty-eight, this charming gay man celebrates his birthday twice a year. “You never know,” he says.
One can hardly imagine the suffering he endured. Von Groszheim was among 230 men arrested in Lübeck in the course of a single evening in 1937. The police hauled him from his home and imprisoned him for ten months. He was released, but re-arrested. This time, the Nazi authorities forced him to choose between castration, or incarceration at the concentration camp in Sachsenhausen. He submitted to castration.
His nightmare had not ended, however. In 1943, von Groszheim was arrested a third time, and was put into a satellite camp of Neuengamme. He survived that ordel, but half a century would have to pass before he started to tell his story.
— Dr. Klaus Müller
Introduction to THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE
(Image Url)

LGBTQ* Stories of Survival

“I’m living proof that Hitler didn’t win.

I’m aware of that every day.” The speaker is Friedrich-Paul von Groszheim. (pictured above) At the age of eighty-eight, this charming gay man celebrates his birthday twice a year. “You never know,” he says.

One can hardly imagine the suffering he endured. Von Groszheim was among 230 men arrested in Lübeck in the course of a single evening in 1937. The police hauled him from his home and imprisoned him for ten months. He was released, but re-arrested. This time, the Nazi authorities forced him to choose between castration, or incarceration at the concentration camp in Sachsenhausen. He submitted to castration.

His nightmare had not ended, however. In 1943, von Groszheim was arrested a third time, and was put into a satellite camp of Neuengamme. He survived that ordel, but half a century would have to pass before he started to tell his story.

— Dr. Klaus Müller

Introduction to THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE

(Image Url)

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(and then what happened)
Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.
To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(and then what happened)

Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.

To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

Dec 8

LGBTQ* Memorials, Plaques and History

Gay Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Germany

Above is the short film footage played on a loop inside the Gay Holocaust Memorial in Berlin.

Opened in 2008 - the memorial recognizes the 55,000 men held in concentration camps for “crimes against the state” and “crimes against nature” (as stated in Germany’s Paragraph 175). It is approximated that 15,000 of these men were executed in the concentration camps.

Is there any special symbol for lesbianism? Like the pink triangle for gays?

There are many unique symbols which represent various groups within the LGBTQ* at any given moment in history.

Where the Pink Triangle started as a symbol used to condemn gay men during the Holocaust and then became a symbol of empowerment in the late 1960s/early 1970s, many lesbians used the Labrys.

Labrys

The Labrys, or double-headed battle ax (now, now, are you done with the joke?), is based on a symbol found in ancient Crete. The Labrys became a symbol of feminist and lesbian empowerment in the 1970s.

During this time, women (mostly lesbian focused groups) reclaimed the inverted Black Triangle. While the Pink Triangle was reserved for men tried for homosexuality (laws created by Paragraph 175), women who did not fit the ideal role of women within Nazi structure where often given a black triangle. Some people speculate this included lesbian women. However, there hasn’t been many documented printings of Black Triangle stories.

Blue stars where also the sign of lesbian/alternative women at the turn of the 20th Century. 

 LGBTQ* Slogans, Prints and Sayings

"Don’t Be A Square" from Fabulously Gay 

 LGBTQ* Slogans, Prints and Sayings

"Don’t Be A Square" from Fabulously Gay 

Oct 2
LGBTQ* Plays, Monologues and Theatre 
Bent by Martin Sherman
(check local theatres for productions of play — also a film staring Clive Owen, Mick Jagger, Jude Law and Ian McKellen)
Bent is an award-winning play about the persecution of homosexuals by Nazis during  World War II. In Germany, the Nazi party’s program of genocide against  any and all perceived “enemies” is coming into full swing when the party  begins a violent purge of homosexuals in its membership. Max, a bisexual playboy, is attending an orgy thrown by drag queen “Greta” and featuring a number of party members when the festivities are raided by the police; Max and his lover Rudy escape, but they are later arrested and sentenced to a concentration  camp. En route to the camp, Max betrays Rudy and arranges to be given a  yellow identification star, marking him as a Jew, instead of a pink  triangle, which would signify him as gay; while the Jews are destined to  be executed, gay prisoners receive even more brutal treatment from the  guards. While incarcerated, Max meets Horst,  an inmate who proudly wears the pink triangle. Max and Horst fall in  love with each other, and Horst’s bravery leads Max to accept his sexual  identity.(from MoviePhone)

LGBTQ* Plays, Monologues and Theatre

Bent by Martin Sherman

(check local theatres for productions of play — also a film staring Clive Owen, Mick Jagger, Jude Law and Ian McKellen)

Bent is an award-winning play about the persecution of homosexuals by Nazis during World War II. In Germany, the Nazi party’s program of genocide against any and all perceived “enemies” is coming into full swing when the party begins a violent purge of homosexuals in its membership. Max, a bisexual playboy, is attending an orgy thrown by drag queen “Greta” and featuring a number of party members when the festivities are raided by the police; Max and his lover Rudy escape, but they are later arrested and sentenced to a concentration camp. En route to the camp, Max betrays Rudy and arranges to be given a yellow identification star, marking him as a Jew, instead of a pink triangle, which would signify him as gay; while the Jews are destined to be executed, gay prisoners receive even more brutal treatment from the guards. While incarcerated, Max meets Horst, an inmate who proudly wears the pink triangle. Max and Horst fall in love with each other, and Horst’s bravery leads Max to accept his sexual identity.(from MoviePhone)