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Posts tagged with "literature"

It’s Banned Book Week!
(Shirt from Skreened.com)
Who’s Your Favorite LGBTQ* Character?

It’s Banned Book Week!

(Shirt from Skreened.com)

Who’s Your Favorite LGBTQ* Character?


Dec 3
BOOKS, Books Everywhere, and Finding a Queer* One for Me!
Are you going home for the Holidays? Do you finally have time to read things for pleasure again? Are you trying to come out to your friends and would like some help?
**Ok, to explain, I kept showing up to Feminist Theory (while I was in undergrad) with different Lesbian/Queer* texts until my adviser finally asked me if I needed to talk. I am the person who used book jackets to start conversations.
Back to the books! 
Be sure to check out the KNOWhomo Literature, Theory, and Graphic Novel pages. It’s always a great place to start.
Keep On, Keeping On!
-Rebecca
(Some of my personal collection shown above. If you’d like any information on any of those texts, please let me know.)
?

BOOKS, Books Everywhere, and Finding a Queer* One for Me!

Are you going home for the Holidays? Do you finally have time to read things for pleasure again? Are you trying to come out to your friends and would like some help?

**Ok, to explain, I kept showing up to Feminist Theory (while I was in undergrad) with different Lesbian/Queer* texts until my adviser finally asked me if I needed to talk. I am the person who used book jackets to start conversations.

Back to the books! 

Be sure to check out the KNOWhomo Literature, Theory, and Graphic Novel pages. It’s always a great place to start.

Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca

(Some of my personal collection shown above. If you’d like any information on any of those texts, please let me know.)

?

Nov 5
LGBTQ* Couples in History
Margaret Wise Brown & Blanche Oelrichs
Margaret Wise Brown: Author, Children’s Book Author, Editor
Blanche Oelrichs (aka Michael Strange): Poet, Actress, ex-wife of John Barrymore
About the relationship:
Despite a twenty years difference in age (or the fact that it was the mid-Twentieth Century), Margaret Wise Brown’s and Blanche Oelrichs’ relationship began in 1940. The two worked together early in Brown’s career, with Oelrichs offering advice and insight to the young writer. Over time, the two’s professional standing changed to a romantic relationship. They were together ten years and lived together in Manhattan from 1943-1950. Oelrichs died in 1950.
 
How do you know either of these people?
Many of us grew up on Margaret Wise Brown’s books.
   
Books Written by Margaret Wise Brown (and published) during their relationship:
The Runaway Bunny (Harper & Row, 1942)
Red Light Green Light(Doubleday, Doran and Company, 1944)
They All Saw It, illustrated by Ylla (Harper & Brothers, 1944)
Little Fur Family (Harper & Brothers, 1946)
The Little Island (Doubleday, 1946)
Little Lost Lamb (Doubleday, 1945)
Goodnight Moon (Harper & Brothers, 1947)
The Sleepy Little Lion, illustrated by Ylla (Harper & Brothers, 1947)
Wait till the Moon is Full (Harper & Brothers, 1948)
The Important Book (Harper & Brothers, 1949)
The Color Kittens (Little Golden Books, 1949)
My World (Harper, 1949)

LGBTQ* Couples in History

Margaret Wise Brown & Blanche Oelrichs

Margaret Wise Brown: Author, Children’s Book Author, Editor

Blanche Oelrichs (aka Michael Strange): Poet, Actress, ex-wife of John Barrymore

About the relationship:

Despite a twenty years difference in age (or the fact that it was the mid-Twentieth Century), Margaret Wise Brown’s and Blanche Oelrichs’ relationship began in 1940. The two worked together early in Brown’s career, with Oelrichs offering advice and insight to the young writer. Over time, the two’s professional standing changed to a romantic relationship. They were together ten years and lived together in Manhattan from 1943-1950. Oelrichs died in 1950.

 

How do you know either of these people?

Many of us grew up on Margaret Wise Brown’s books.

image   image

Books Written by Margaret Wise Brown (and published) during their relationship:

The Runaway Bunny (Harper & Row, 1942)

Red Light Green Light(Doubleday, Doran and Company, 1944)

They All Saw It, illustrated by Ylla (Harper & Brothers, 1944)

Little Fur Family (Harper & Brothers, 1946)

The Little Island (Doubleday, 1946)

Little Lost Lamb (Doubleday, 1945)

Goodnight Moon (Harper & Brothers, 1947)

The Sleepy Little Lion, illustrated by Ylla (Harper & Brothers, 1947)

Wait till the Moon is Full (Harper & Brothers, 1948)

The Important Book (Harper & Brothers, 1949)

The Color Kittens (Little Golden Books, 1949)

My World (Harper, 1949)

There are many forms of love and affection, some people can spend their whole lives together without knowing each other’s names. Naming is a difficult and time-consuming process; it concerns essences, and it means power. But on the wild nights who can call you home? Only the one who knows your name. — Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit

-

LGBTQ* Tumblrs You Should Know

Queer Between The Lines 

"Words are beautiful. You are beautiful."

(You can tell  Queer Between The Lines's moderator* that you look forward to meeting her soon. She will be one of the newest members to the KNOWhomo family as the Vlog launches.)

Oct 8
LGBTQ* Resources You Might Have Overlooked
GoodReads.com's Lists of LGBTQ* Books/Discussion Groups
(photo from: BlogHer)
Just click a hashtag below to be brought to hundreds of book titles. LGBT* lists include countless additional lists. Poetry, Graphic Novels, etc are much more concise lists.
(If you are a member of Good Reads and would like to follow/discuss books with another fellow bibliophile, my profile can be found HERE)
#Gay 
#Lesbian
#Bisexual
#Transgender
#Gender
#Gay/Queer Poetry (The first book listed is Siken’s CRUSH, which I HIGHLY recommend)
#Queer* Graphic Novels
#A Hint of Queer

LGBTQ* Resources You Might Have Overlooked

GoodReads.com's Lists of LGBTQ* Books/Discussion Groups

(photo from: BlogHer)

Just click a hashtag below to be brought to hundreds of book titles. LGBT* lists include countless additional lists. Poetry, Graphic Novels, etc are much more concise lists.

(If you are a member of Good Reads and would like to follow/discuss books with another fellow bibliophile, my profile can be found HERE)

#Gay 

#Lesbian

#Bisexual

#Transgender

#Gender

#Gay/Queer Poetry (The first book listed is Siken’s CRUSH, which I HIGHLY recommend)

#Queer* Graphic Novels

#A Hint of Queer

Sep 6

Reading Between The Lines

KNOWhomo Question of the Week:

Your favorite book/comic/graphic novel/short story with a LGBTQ* character?

Favorite LGBTQ* novel?

**Remember: You can check the comments for recommendations for future reading. You can also check in with the KNOWhomo hashtags #Book(s)  and #Comic(s)/Graphic Novels 

LGBTQ* Interviews and History You Should Know
(to learn more about Barbara Gittings, click HERE for a previous KNOWhomo post)
Illustration from Sidonie G. Colette’s Claudine a l’ ecole (1905?)
Following text from:
Jonathan Ned Katz. Copyright (c) 2008 Reedited by Katz from Gay American History (1976).
In an interview taped on July 19, 1974, Barbara Gittings spoke with the present author (Jonathan Katz) about her development as a Lesbian, and about the founding and early history of the New York Daughters of Bilitis.
*excerpt*
J.K.: Was there no one you could talk to about the subject?
B.G.: No, I didn’t know anyone to talk to. So I went looking in the bars. I didn’t have much success talking to people in the bars, especially about the literature. These were women’s bars in New York City. I had great difficulty in finding women who had read the same books I had. It was important to me to meet other Lesbians as Lesbians, but I still needed more than that. I needed to find Lesbians who shared my interests. Once when I went to a bar in New York City I had with me Colette’s very first novel, from the Philadelphia Free Library, one of the Claudine series, Claudine a l’ ecole, and it  happened to have illustrations. There was an illustration of Claudine’s two female schoolteachers who were having an affair-one sitting on the lap of the other, embracing very ardently. I was fascinated by the novel, and fascinated by the picture, a line drawing. It seemed to me very bold to have a picture like that in a book published early in the twentieth century for the general public. I was in this bar and trying to talk to somebody-and I showed her this book, and this drawing, trying to make her understand why this is such a remarkable illustration, and she says, “Oh, at home I’ve got a lot sexier pictures than that.” I didn’t understand what she meant; now I do!
There weren’t people I could talk to about the kind of literature I was interested in. A few people had read The Well of Loneliness. Fewer still read any of the others, novels like those of Gale Wilhelm which I found, and which, I recall, had happy endings-for a change. The literature was very important to me. The nonfiction literature gave me a bad picture of myself, a picture I had to work against. The fiction, despite stereotypes, despite unhappiness, despite bad characters, was much more positive.

LGBTQ* Interviews and History You Should Know

(to learn more about Barbara Gittings, click HERE for a previous KNOWhomo post)

Illustration from Sidonie G. Colette’s Claudine a l’ ecole (1905?)

Following text from:

Jonathan Ned Katz. Copyright (c) 2008 Reedited by Katz from Gay American History (1976).

In an interview taped on July 19, 1974, Barbara Gittings spoke with the present author (Jonathan Katz) about her development as a Lesbian, and about the founding and early history of the New York Daughters of Bilitis.

*excerpt*

J.K.: Was there no one you could talk to about the subject?

B.G.: No, I didn’t know anyone to talk to. So I went looking in the bars. I didn’t have much success talking to people in the bars, especially about the literature. These were women’s bars in New York City. I had great difficulty in finding women who had read the same books I had. It was important to me to meet other Lesbians as Lesbians, but I still needed more than that. I needed to find Lesbians who shared my interests. Once when I went to a bar in New York City I had with me Colette’s very first novel, from the Philadelphia Free Library, one of the Claudine series, Claudine a l’ ecole, and it  happened to have illustrations. There was an illustration of Claudine’s two female schoolteachers who were having an affair-one sitting on the lap of the other, embracing very ardently. I was fascinated by the novel, and fascinated by the picture, a line drawing. It seemed to me very bold to have a picture like that in a book published early in the twentieth century for the general public. I was in this bar and trying to talk to somebody-and I showed her this book, and this drawing, trying to make her understand why this is such a remarkable illustration, and she says, “Oh, at home I’ve got a lot sexier pictures than that.” I didn’t understand what she meant; now I do!


There weren’t people I could talk to about the kind of literature I was interested in. A few people had read The Well of Loneliness. Fewer still read any of the others, novels like those of Gale Wilhelm which I found, and which, I recall, had happy endings-for a change. The literature was very important to me. The nonfiction literature gave me a bad picture of myself, a picture I had to work against. The fiction, despite stereotypes, despite unhappiness, despite bad characters, was much more positive.

LGBTQ* Literature You May Want To Know
Rubyfruit Jungle - Rita Mae Brown

LGBTQ* Literature You May Want To Know


Rubyfruit Jungle - Rita Mae Brown

Aug 6
Me Too!
Shirt from Skreened.com

KNOWhomo Question of the Week:
Who’s your favorite (gay/LGBTQ*) fictional character?

Me Too!

Shirt from Skreened.com

KNOWhomo Question of the Week:

Who’s your favorite (gay/LGBTQ*) fictional character?

LGBTQ* Novels/Books To Keep On Your Radar

Novels with Black/African-American Lesbian Themes or Characters (1920s-1970s)

  1. Home To Harlem by Claude McKay (1928) - two scenes set in black lesbian bars, glimpses of early Harlem
  2. Young Man with a Horn by Dorothy Baker (1938) - Josephine Jordan, a  singer, has a relationship with Amy North, a wealthy woman
  3. The Wasteland by Jo Sinclair (1946) - novel depicting the oppression of women of color and opposition to women of color in lesbian circles 
  4. The Big Money by John Dos Passos (1960) - Harlem 1920s
  5. Loving Her by Ann Allen Shockley (1974) - one of the first novels to explore interracial relationships between lesbians
  6. Strange Brothers by Blair Niles (1975) - Book takes liberties and draws from Harlem lesbian culture of the 1920s 
  7. Ruby by Rosa Guy (1976) - West Indian girl finds friendship after relocating
  8. In Her Day by Rita Mae Brown (1976) - longtime friendship of Adele, a wealthy lesbian woman of color, and Carole, a working-class white lesbian woman
  9. Ed Dean is Queer by N.A. Diaman (1978) - San Francisco elects their new mayor (a queer woman of color) 

List/Information From:

Richards, Dell. Lesbian Lists: A Look at Lesbian Culture, History, and Personalities. Boston: Alyson Publications, 1990. p.34

Jul 5
LGBTQ* Novels You (Should) Know
Like Son by Felicia Luna Lemus
Frank Cruz, born Francisca, leaves California for New york where he finds love with the beautiful, mysterious Nathalie, whose frequent disappearances make Frank reexamine his past and what he wants from love.

LGBTQ* Novels You (Should) Know

Like Son by Felicia Luna Lemus

Frank Cruz, born Francisca, leaves California for New york where he finds love with the beautiful, mysterious Nathalie, whose frequent disappearances make Frank reexamine his past and what he wants from love.

Jul 2

LGBTQ* Theory Books (You May Want) To Know

  • Feminism is Queer: The Intimate Connection between Queer and Feminist Theory - Mimi Marinucci

  • Mad for Foucault: Rethinking the Foundations of Queer Theory (Gender and Culture) - Lynne Huffer

  • Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity - Judith Butler

  • Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics, and Literature (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies) - Qwo-Li Driskill (Editor), Chris Finley (Editor), Brian Joseph Gilley (Editor), Scott Lauria Morgensen (Editor)

  • Please Select Your Gender: From the Invention of Hysteria to the Democratizing of Transgenderism - Patricia Gherovici 


  • Queer Cowboys: And Other Erotic Male Friendships in Nineteenth-Century American Literature - Chris Packard


  • Aberrations In Black: Toward A Queer Of Color Critique (Critical American Studies) - Roderick A. Ferguson


  • Queer Girls in Class (Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education) - Lori Horvitz 
LGBTQ* Quotes and Books You Should Know

Quentin CrispThe Naked Civil Servant, 1978

LGBTQ* Quotes and Books You Should Know


Quentin Crisp
The Naked Civil Servant, 1978

Jun 6
LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips
Jodi Picoult’s first same-sex focused novel

LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips

Jodi Picoult’s first same-sex focused novel

Jun 1
LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar
A Boy’s Own Story by Edmund White
A Boy’s Own Story is the first of Edmund White’s highly acclaimed trilogy of autobiographical novels that brilliantly evoke a young man’s coming of age and document American gay life through the last forty years. The nameless narrator in this deeply affecting work reminisces about growing up in the 1950s with emotionally aloof, divorced parents, an unrelenting sister, and the schoolmates who taunt him. 
He finds consolation in literature and his fantastic imagination. Eager to cultivate intimate, enduring friendships, he becomes aware of his yearning to be loved by men, and struggles with the guilt and shame of accepting who he is. (text from GoodReads) 

LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar

A Boy’s Own Story by Edmund White

A Boy’s Own Story is the first of Edmund White’s highly acclaimed trilogy of autobiographical novels that brilliantly evoke a young man’s coming of age and document American gay life through the last forty years. 

The nameless narrator in this deeply affecting work reminisces about growing up in the 1950s with emotionally aloof, divorced parents, an unrelenting sister, and the schoolmates who taunt him. 

He finds consolation in literature and his fantastic imagination. Eager to cultivate intimate, enduring friendships, he becomes aware of his yearning to be loved by men, and struggles with the guilt and shame of accepting who he is. (text from GoodReads)