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Bullying Political Cartoons
“Life is a fight, but not everyone’s a fighter. Otherwise, bullies would be an endangered species.” ― Andrew Vachss, Terminal
“It gets better. It seems hard, you know, I think being different is always gonna be a tough climb. There’s always gonna be people that are scared of it. But at the end of the day you give those bullies, those people, that are so ignorant, if you give them the power to affect you, you’re letting them win. And they don’t deserve that. What you’re doing by being yourself is you’re keeping it real, and you’re being really brave.” ― Adam Lambert
“You should be nicer to him,’ a schoolmate had once said to me of some awfully ill-favored boy. ‘He has no friends.’ This, I realized with a pang of pity that I can still remember, was only true as long as everybody agreed to it.” ― Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22: A Memoir
“When people see you’re happy doing what you’re doing, it sort of takes the power away from them to tease you about it.” ― Wendy Mass, Every Soul A Star
“With ignorance comes fear- from fear comes bigotry. Education is the key to acceptance.” ― Kathleen Patel, The Bullying Epidemic-the guide to arm you for the fight
“When people hurt you over and over, think of them like sand paper. They may scratch and hurt you a bit, but in the end, you end up polished and they end up useless.” ― Chris Colfer

Bullying Political Cartoons

“Life is a fight, but not everyone’s a fighter. Otherwise, bullies would be an endangered species.” 
― Andrew VachssTerminal

“It gets better. It seems hard, you know, I think being different is always gonna be a tough climb. There’s always gonna be people that are scared of it. But at the end of the day you give those bullies, those people, that are so ignorant, if you give them the power to affect you, you’re letting them win. And they don’t deserve that. What you’re doing by being yourself is you’re keeping it real, and you’re being really brave.” 
― Adam Lambert

“You should be nicer to him,’ a schoolmate had once said to me of some awfully ill-favored boy. ‘He has no friends.’ This, I realized with a pang of pity that I can still remember, was only true as long as everybody agreed to it.” 
― Christopher HitchensHitch-22: A Memoir

“When people see you’re happy doing what you’re doing, it sort of takes the power away from them to tease you about it.” 
― Wendy MassEvery Soul A Star

“With ignorance comes fear- from fear comes bigotry. Education is the key to acceptance.” 
― Kathleen PatelThe Bullying Epidemic-the guide to arm you for the fight

“When people hurt you over and over, think of them like sand paper. They may scratch and hurt you a bit, but in the end, you end up polished and they end up useless.” 
― Chris Colfer

LGBTQ* Did You Know Art History
Did you know? BATMAN is (not) Gay!
In 2005, DC comics sent a “cease and desist” letter to both Mark Chamberlain (the artist of the above image) and Kathleen Cullen Fine Art’s studio telling them to pull all artwork depicting the DC characters.
Due to copyright infringement (DC owns Batman’s image), DC and Chamberlain eventually settled on displaying the images but not selling them.
 
(Picture Web Source Unknown)

LGBTQ* Did You Know Art History

Did you know? BATMAN is (not) Gay!

In 2005, DC comics sent a “cease and desist” letter to both Mark Chamberlain (the artist of the above image) and Kathleen Cullen Fine Art’s studio telling them to pull all artwork depicting the DC characters.

Due to copyright infringement (DC owns Batman’s image), DC and Chamberlain eventually settled on displaying the images but not selling them.

 

(Picture Web Source Unknown)

LGBTQ* Reading List: Butch/Femme 101


Evolving in the 1940s, Butch and Femme are words with a lot of weight and power in queer culture. Ever wonder why some LGBTQ*-identified people get upset if straight women claim “Femme” as part of their identity? Want to join the (years-long) debate about whether a Butch/Femme relationship conforms to or subverts heteronormative gender roles? Not sure what the words really mean or where they came from in the first place? Brush up on your reading with these texts—and if they whet your appetite for knowledge, don’t forget to keep digging over at the Lesbrary or the Lesbian Herstory Archives.

<3 Ruth Elizabeth

1. Butch is a Noun, by S. Bear Bergman.

2. Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg.

3. Dagger: On Butch Women, edited by Lily Burana and Roxxie Linea Due.

4. The Persistent Desire, A Femme-Butch Reader, edited by Joan Nestle.

5. Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme, edited by Ivan E. Coyote and Zena Sharman. 

6. Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America, by Lillian Faderman

7. Brazen Femme: Queering Femininity, edited by Chloe Brushwood Rose and Anna Camilleri.

8. Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities, edited by Del Lagrace Volcano and Ulrika Dahl

LGBTQ* Theory and Print
Queer Theory, Gender Theory —- Riki Wilchins
Chapter 6: Foucault and the Disciplinary Society

LGBTQ* Theory and Print

Queer Theory, Gender Theory —- Riki Wilchins

Chapter 6: Foucault and the Disciplinary Society

LGBTQ* Poets and Paintings 
Although They Are

Although they are only breath, words which I command are immortal 
— Sappho

Painting: 
Sappho sings for Homer, 1824 
Charles Nicolas Rafael Lafond (1774–1835)
(place jpeg was pulled from - unknown)

LGBTQ* Poets and Paintings 

Although They Are

Although they are 
only breath, words 
which I command 
are immortal 

— Sappho

Painting: 

Sappho sings for Homer, 1824 

Charles Nicolas Rafael Lafond (1774–1835)

(place jpeg was pulled from - unknown)

How to Put On a Chest Binder
(All text from: www.transguys.com)

It might seem silly, but you’re probably going to need some help figuring out how to put on your new binder, particularly if you purchased one of the longer styles.
Put your binder inside out and upside down.
Step into your binder and pull the bottom of it up, ideally to your belt line. The binder should still be inside out and upside down.
Use the sleeves as handles to pull the top of the binder (the end closer to your feet) up to your shoulders.
Put your arms through the sleeve holes and adjust your chest to your needs. You may need to pull the bottom of the binder out from underneath itself if you don’t want it folded under. For others, leaving it folded under may help stop the binder from rolling up.
Don’t be disappointed if you look in the mirror and it looks like you have one big boob in the middle of your chest. You just need to adjust your chest. Reach in from the neck hole and push your chesticles down and out. You’re basically pushing your nipple toward your armpit to achieve the flattest looking chest possible.

How to Put On a Chest Binder

(All text from: www.transguys.com)

It might seem silly, but you’re probably going to need some help figuring out how to put on your new binder, particularly if you purchased one of the longer styles.

  1. Put your binder inside out and upside down.
  2. Step into your binder and pull the bottom of it up, ideally to your belt line. The binder should still be inside out and upside down.
  3. Use the sleeves as handles to pull the top of the binder (the end closer to your feet) up to your shoulders.
  4. Put your arms through the sleeve holes and adjust your chest to your needs. You may need to pull the bottom of the binder out from underneath itself if you don’t want it folded under. For others, leaving it folded under may help stop the binder from rolling up.

Don’t be disappointed if you look in the mirror and it looks like you have one big boob in the middle of your chest. You just need to adjust your chest. Reach in from the neck hole and push your chesticles down and out. You’re basically pushing your nipple toward your armpit to achieve the flattest looking chest possible.

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(and then what happened)
Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.
To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.
Would you like to know more? Check out:
#History You Should Know 
#Black/African American 
#Pink Triangle History 
#Flag(s) History 
#Military/Armed Forces 
#Vintage 
#Christian 
#Jewish 
#Muslim 
 

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(and then what happened)

Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.

To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.

Would you like to know more? Check out:

#History You Should Know 

#Black/African American 

#Pink Triangle History 

#Flag(s) History 

#Military/Armed Forces 

#Vintage 

#Christian 

#Jewish 

#Muslim 

 

Dear hypothetically gay son,

You’re gay. Obviously you already know that, because you told us at the dinner table last night. I apologize for the awkward silence afterwards, but I was chewing. It was like when we’re at a restaurant and the waiter comes up mid-bite and asks how the meal is, only in this metaphor you are the waiter, and instead of asking me about my meal, you said you were gay. I don’t know why I needed to explain that. I think I needed to find a funny way to repeat the fact that you’re gay… because that is what it sounds like in my head right now: “My son is gay. My son is gay. My son is gay.”

Let me be perfectly clear: I love you. I will always love you. Since being gay is part of who you are, I love that you’re gay. I’m just trying to wrap my head around the idea. If you sensed any sadness in my silence last night, it was because I was surprised that I was surprised. Ideally, I would have already known. Since you were an embryo, my intent has always been to really know you for who you are and not who I expect you to be. And yet, I was taken by surprise at last night’s dinner. Have I said “surprise” enough in this paragraph? One more time: Surprise!

OK. Let’s get a few things straight about how things are going to be.

Our home is a place of safety and love. The world has dealt you a difficult card. While LGBT people are becoming more accepted, it is still a difficult path to walk. You’re going to experience hate and anger and misunderstandings about who you are out in the world. That will not happen here. You need to know with every fiber of who you are that when you walk in the front door of your home, you are safe, and you are loved. Your mother is in complete agreement with me on this.
I am still, as always, your biggest defender. Just because you’re gay doesn’t mean you’re any less capable of taking care of and defending yourself. That said, if you need me to stand next to you or in front of you, write letters, sign petitions, advocate, or anything else, I am here. I would go to war for you.

If you’re going to have boys over, you now need to leave your bedroom door open. Sorry, kiddo. Them’s the breaks. I couldn’t have girls in my room with the door shut, so you don’t get to have boys.

You and I are going to revisit that talk we had about safe sex. I know it’s going to be awkward for both of us, but it is important. I need to do some research first, so let’s give it a few weeks. If you have questions or concerns before then, let me know.

That’s enough for now. Feel free to view this letter as a contract. If I ever fail to meet any of the commitments made herein, pull it out and hold me to account. I’ll end with this: You are not broken. You are whole, and beautiful. You are capable and compassionate. You and your sister are the best things I have ever done with my life, and I couldn’t be prouder of the people you’ve become.

Love,
Dad

P.S. Thanks to a few key Supreme Court decisions and the Marriage Equality Act of 2020, you’re legally able to get married. When I was your age, that was just an idea. Pretty cool, huh?


(from John Kinnear)

- From Huffington’s Post’s “Dear Hypothetical Gay Son” (via knowhomo)

LGBTQ* YA Novels You May Have Missed
(and Kh moderators are currently reading)
Following from GoodReads:

If You Could Be Mine
by Sara Farizan

In this stunning debut, a young Iranian American writer pulls back the curtain on one of the most hidden corners of a much-talked-about culture.Seventeen-year-old Sahar has been in love with her best friend, Nasrin, since they were six. They’ve shared stolen kisses and romantic promises. But Iran is a dangerous place for two girls in love—Sahar and Nasrin could be beaten, imprisoned, even executed if their relationship came to light.So they carry on in secret—until Nasrin’s parents announce that they’ve arranged for her marriage. Nasrin tries to persuade Sahar that they can go on as they have been, only now with new comforts provided by the decent, well-to-do doctor Nasrin will marry. But Sahar dreams of loving Nasrin exclusively—and openly.Then Sahar discovers what seems like the perfect solution. In Iran, homosexuality may be a crime, but to be a man trapped in a woman’s body is seen as nature’s mistake, and sex reassignment is legal and accessible. As a man, Sahar could be the one to marry Nasrin. Sahar will never be able to love the one she wants, in the body she wants to be loved in, without risking her life. Is saving her love worth sacrificing her true self?

LGBTQ* YA Novels You May Have Missed

(and Kh moderators are currently reading)

Following from GoodReads:

If You Could Be Mine

In this stunning debut, a young Iranian American writer pulls back the curtain on one of the most hidden corners of a much-talked-about culture.

Seventeen-year-old Sahar has been in love with her best friend, Nasrin, since they were six. They’ve shared stolen kisses and romantic promises. But Iran is a dangerous place for two girls in love—Sahar and Nasrin could be beaten, imprisoned, even executed if their relationship came to light.

So they carry on in secret—until Nasrin’s parents announce that they’ve arranged for her marriage. Nasrin tries to persuade Sahar that they can go on as they have been, only now with new comforts provided by the decent, well-to-do doctor Nasrin will marry. But Sahar dreams of loving Nasrin exclusively—and openly.

Then Sahar discovers what seems like the perfect solution. In Iran, homosexuality may be a crime, but to be a man trapped in a woman’s body is seen as nature’s mistake, and sex reassignment is legal and accessible. As a man, Sahar could be the one to marry Nasrin. Sahar will never be able to love the one she wants, in the body she wants to be loved in, without risking her life. Is saving her love worth sacrificing her true self?
Sep 9

LGBTQ* Performance Artists in History

Barbette (Texas, b. 1904)

“Women think about love more than men; that’s because men think more about women.”—Barbette

Barbette was a female impersonator who took Paris by storm in the late 1920’s. Barbette’s performances included aerial acts, trapeze, and stunning costumes, Barbette would close the show by removing his wig and declaring himself an man to adoring fans. 

Additional History?

Julie Andrews character(s) in Victor/Victoria is (loosely) based on Barbette. Note: Victor/Victoria is based on a series of previous films (including titles: Viktor und Victoria (1933) and First a Girl (1935) ), which Barbette was the inspiration for. 

Barbette was photographed by Man Ray.

 

Information from: 

Greif, Martin. The Gay Book of Days: An Evocatively Illustrated Who’s Who of Who Is, Was, May Have Been, Probably Was, and Almost Certainly Seems to Have Been Gay during the past 5,000 Years. Secaucus, NJ: L. Stuart, 1982. 

1st Photo Source:  Male Soul Makeup

Barbette aka Vander Clyde

Female impersonator, high wire performer and trapeze artist 1920s – 1930s

2nd Photo Source:  Gorgonetta’s Tumblr

Barbette - Photography by Man Ray

 

Sep 9
LGBTQ* Infographics You May Have Missed
By the numbers.   
Imagine how strong the numbers would be if everyone participated in the Census every 10 years.
Based on 2010 Census informationfrom Andrew Lee, 2011

LGBTQ* Infographics You May Have Missed

By the numbers.


Imagine how strong the numbers would be if everyone participated in the Census every 10 years.

Based on 2010 Census information
from Andrew Lee, 2011

Sep 8
Today in LGBTQ* History
September 8th, 1907
Gertrude Stein arrives in Paris (1907), her first day as an expat, and meets Alice B. Toklas. The two quickly fall in love (Stein often called Toklas &#8220;wifey&#8221;) and remain together until Stein&#8217;s death (1946).

Information Source: What is Remembered by Alice B. Toklas
Photo Source: Image ID: 486951
Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein on the Terrace at Bilignin, June 13, 1934.

Today in LGBTQ* History

September 8th, 1907

Gertrude Stein arrives in Paris (1907), her first day as an expat, and meets Alice B. Toklas. The two quickly fall in love (Stein often called Toklas “wifey”) and remain together until Stein’s death (1946).

Information Source: What is Remembered by Alice B. Toklas

Photo Source: Image ID: 486951

Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein on the Terrace at Bilignin, June 13, 1934.

knowhomo Reblog for R.A.&#8217;s and Teachers

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS
(read more HERE)
1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth
Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.
2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various
Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.
3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth
There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.
4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.
Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.
Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

knowhomo Reblog for R.A.’s and Teachers

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS

(read more HERE)

1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth

Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.

2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various

Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.

3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth

There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.

4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.

Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.

Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

LGBTQ* (YA) Novels To Keep On Your Radar

Hild by Nicol Griffith

(Following from Goodreads)
Hild is born into a world in transition. In seventh-century Britain, small kingdoms are merging, usually violently. A new religion is coming ashore; the old gods’ priests are worrying. Edwin of Northumbria plots to become overking of the Angles, ruthlessly using every tool at his disposal: blood, bribery, belief.Hild is the king’s youngest niece. She has the powerful curiosity of a bright child, a will of adamant, and a way of seeing the world—of studying nature, of matching cause with effect, of observing human nature and predicting what will happen next—that can seem uncanny, even supernatural, to those around her. She establishes herself as the king’s seer. And she is indispensable—until she should ever lead the king astray. The stakes are life and death: for Hild, her family, her loved ones, and the increasing numbers who seek the protection of the strange girl who can read the world and see the future.Hild is a young woman at the heart of the violence, subtlety, and mysticism of the early medieval age—all of it brilliantly and accurately evoked by Nicola Griffith’s luminous prose. Recalling such feats of historical fiction as Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Sigrid Undset’s KristinLavransdatter, Hild brings a beautiful, brutal world—and one of its most fascinating, pivotal figures, the girl who would become St. Hilda of Whitby—to vivid, absorbing life

LGBTQ* (YA) Novels To Keep On Your Radar

Hild by Nicol Griffith

(Following from Goodreads)

Hild is born into a world in transition. In seventh-century Britain, small kingdoms are merging, usually violently. A new religion is coming ashore; the old gods’ priests are worrying. Edwin of Northumbria plots to become overking of the Angles, ruthlessly using every tool at his disposal: blood, bribery, belief.

Hild is the king’s youngest niece. She has the powerful curiosity of a bright child, a will of adamant, and a way of seeing the world—of studying nature, of matching cause with effect, of observing human nature and predicting what will happen next—that can seem uncanny, even supernatural, to those around her. She establishes herself as the king’s seer. And she is indispensable—until she should ever lead the king astray. The stakes are life and death: for Hild, her family, her loved ones, and the increasing numbers who seek the protection of the strange girl who can read the world and see the future.

Hild is a young woman at the heart of the violence, subtlety, and mysticism of the early medieval age—all of it brilliantly and accurately evoked by Nicola Griffith’s luminous prose. Recalling such feats of historical fiction as Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Sigrid Undset’s KristinLavransdatterHild brings a beautiful, brutal world—and one of its most fascinating, pivotal figures, the girl who would become St. Hilda of Whitby—to vivid, absorbing life

LGBTQ* Children’s Books You May Have Missed:

One Dad, Two Dads, Brown Dad, Blue Dads

by Johnny Valentine, illustrated by Melody Sarecky

So this happened: Rebecca went to the children’s section of the library when working on our theses became a bit too much to bear, and this is what she found. Looks like the universe knew we needed something to cheer us up!

Published in 1994 from Alyson Wonderland (an imprint of Alyson Books), One Dad, Two Dads, Brown Dad, Blue Dads is a spectacular example of children’s authors who are doing it right. The book is inclusive of many kinds of diverse family structures and addresses the difficult-to-articulate complications of navigating awkward questions from strangers as a child in a family that might not fit into the cookie-cutter family structure depicted in many mainstream children’s books.

I hope you find time soon to grab a copy and snuggle up with someone you adore to celebrate the love we find in each other from all corners of the queer community.

<3 Ruth Elizabeth

(Source: queerbetweenthelines)