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KNOWhomo’s Library 

(as requested by anon)

Hi Everyone,

The KNOWhomo team has received a few emails asking what we’re reading/researching/collecting for our Queer* Library. I decided to share photos of my reference and reading group selections bookcaseI’m inviting the other KNOWhomo mods to login and do the same….(hint, hint) 

Most of the books shown above have been purchased second hand over the course of a few years. I highly recommend searching at used bookstore shelves, library sales, and your local used book stores to help increase your own libraries.

I lived in the rural deep South for high school and college. My first queer* books were purchased at a church donation sale, all published by Alyson Books. It’s possible to find representation of yourself if you KNOW where to look. I recommend becoming familiar with titles, publishers (the spine can help save you so much time), authors, and key words.

Keep On Reading On!

-Rebecca

More Book Recommendations? Check out KNOWhomo's #Books

(following list from Lambda Literary)

LGBT Publishers

LGBT PUBLISHERS

Arktoi Books
Beau to Beau Books
Belhue Press
Bella Books
Blind Eye Books
Blue Feather Books
Bold Strokes Books
Bruno Gmuender
Bywater Books
Cleis Press
Dreamspinner Press
Firebrand
Gertrude Press
Gival Press
Green Candy Press
Harrington Park Press
Homofactus
INTA Press
Icon Empire Press
In Group Press
Intaglio Publications
Kings Crossing Publishing
Lethe Press
Magnus Books
Manic D Press
MLR Press
New Victoria
PD Publishing
Purple Books Publishing
Riptide Publishing
Riverdale Ave
Redbone Press
Roosterfish
Sibling Rivalry Press
Seal Press
Seventh Window Publications
Spinifex Press
Spinster’s Ink
STARbooks Press
Storm Moon Press
Tiny Satchel Press
Transgress Press 
Topside Press
Torquere Press
Wilde City
Wildcat Press
Wilkinson House 

LGBT-FRIENDLY PUBLISHERS

Akashic Books
Anchor Books
Arsenal Pulp Press
Beacon Press
CALYX, Inc.
Columbia University Press
Duke University Press
The Feminist Press
Firbog Publishing
Graywolf Press
HarperCollins
HoughtonMifflin
Hyperion Books
Kensington
Mcsweeny’s 
NYU Press
Orchard House Press
Palgrave Macmillan
Paris Press
Penguin Random House
The Permanent Press
Pilgrim Press
Rebel Satori press
Scholastic
Simon & Schuster Children
Softskull Press
South End Press
St. Martins
St. Martins – Minotaur
St. Martins – Tor
Tranquebar Press
University of Chicago Press
University of Minnesota Press
University of Wisconsin Press

Alan L. Hart
SYMIHC

Podcasts You May Have Missed:

Alan L. Hart  from Stuff You Missed In History Class

Following from Missed In History:

Alan L. Hart was a novelist and a doctor who did groundbreaking work in the world of public health and tuberculosis detection. He was also one of the first people in the United States to undergo surgery as part of transitioning to a different gender than the one to which he had been born. His gender and sexual orientation influenced both his writing and his career. After his transition, he faced extensive discrimination and harassment: For much of his life, he had to move from place to place after colleagues discovered that he had been born female.

Previous KNOWhomo post about Dr. J. Allen Gilbert can be read HERE

NOTE: Some of the language may cause triggers. I  highly recommend listening to Tracy and Holly speak at the end of the podcast. Missed in History works diligently on their research. Language is incredibly complicated and it is quite clear in their discussion that their intention is to be P.C. and inclusive. This may be a bit problematic to some listeners at times, due to language/phrasing used. Please remember we are all learning together and the Stuff You Missed team is very receptive to insightful, polite responses.

Teach Us About Someone! Who Should We Research This Fall?

What LGBTQ* Heroes do you want more people to know about?

Who is your LGBTQ* crush?

What event would you like to know more about?

You can also (private message) if you’d rather not link your tumblr to the account.

Thank you for your help. - Rebecca

LGBTQ* People You Should Know
Albert Cashier :: (December 25, 1843 – October 10, 1915)
-Transgender Civil War Soldier
-Born Jennie Irene Hodgers, in Ireland
-Served for three years in the 95th Illinois Infantry of the Union army 
-Fought in the battles of Nashville, Mobile, and Vicksburg
-Following war, received Veteran’s pension
- Worked in Illinios for forty-plus years following the war as a cemetery worker and deckhand
- After breaking his leg, a nurse questioned Chashier’s gender expression. After (many) a plea from Cashier, the nurse kept the information private
- In 1911, Cashier moved in to Soldier and Sailors Home (an assisted living for former members of the Civil War/U.S. defense)
- Cashier lived there until his mind started to deteriorate (possibly from dementia)
- Following Cashier’s health decline, nurses started to assist Cashier. During this time, reports were filed and Cashier was forced to dress in women’s dresses. 
- Cashier’s tomb read Albert Cashier until 1970 when a second tomb stone was erected with both Cashier’s born name and identified name
 

LGBTQ* People You Should Know

Albert Cashier :: (December 25, 1843October 10, 1915)

-Transgender Civil War Soldier

-Born Jennie Irene Hodgers, in Ireland

-Served for three years in the 95th Illinois Infantry of the Union army

-Fought in the battles of Nashville, Mobile, and Vicksburg

-Following war, received Veteran’s pension

- Worked in Illinios for forty-plus years following the war as a cemetery worker and deckhand

- After breaking his leg, a nurse questioned Chashier’s gender expression. After (many) a plea from Cashier, the nurse kept the information private

- In 1911, Cashier moved in to Soldier and Sailors Home (an assisted living for former members of the Civil War/U.S. defense)

- Cashier lived there until his mind started to deteriorate (possibly from dementia)

- Following Cashier’s health decline, nurses started to assist Cashier. During this time, reports were filed and Cashier was forced to dress in women’s dresses. 

- Cashier’s tomb read Albert Cashier until 1970 when a second tomb stone was erected with both Cashier’s born name and identified name

 Albert Cashier

LGBTQ* Appreciation Post

We, the KNOWhomo team, do not assume the gender identity or sexual orientation of any of the individuals in any of the above photographs.

Photographs have been collected from various sources though origin sources are unknown. 

More? #Vintage

LGBTQ* People You Should Know
Mary Dreier (1875-1963)
*  New York Work Labor and Social Reform activist
* President of the Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL)
* One of the leading suffragettes for women’s rights and immigrants’ rights
* Dreier and her partner Frances Kellor were together for 50 years
Photo: WTUL banner held by (left) Mary E. Dreier and (right) Margaret Dreier Robins (sister - holding purses) 1909

LGBTQ* People You Should Know

Mary Dreier (1875-1963)

*  New York Work Labor and Social Reform activist

* President of the Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL)

* One of the leading suffragettes for women’s rights and immigrants’ rights

* Dreier and her partner Frances Kellor were together for 50 years

Photo: WTUL banner held by (left) Mary E. Dreier and (right) Margaret Dreier Robins (sister - holding purses) 1909

LGBTQ Publications You Should Know
One, Inc.
One, Inc. was the FIRST pro-gay publication in the United States.
Started by members of the Mattachine Society, One, Inc. focused on gay men’s issues, health and political rights.
The premier issue launched November 1952.
Above Picture: One, Inc.’s August 1958 issue, almost 11 years BEFORE Stonewall, claiming homosexual pride.

LGBTQ Publications You Should Know

One, Inc.

One, Inc. was the FIRST pro-gay publication in the United States.

Started by members of the Mattachine Society, One, Inc. focused on gay men’s issues, health and political rights.

The premier issue launched November 1952.

Above Picture: One, Inc.’s August 1958 issue, almost 11 years BEFORE Stonewall, claiming homosexual pride.

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(And Probably Never Heard Of)
Before Asking - Fighting Against the Tells
Seven years before Stonewall, thirty years prior to Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell -
Activists Craig Rodwell and Randy Wicker, along with a small group of others, picketed New York City’s draft board offices in 1962. The political demonstration was done to highlight the unfair persecution of gay and lesbian soldiers in the United States Military and dishonorable discharges being issued to veterans. The protesters also called out the unjust policy of releasing draft-age men’s information of their sexual orientation to employers.

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(And Probably Never Heard Of)

Before Asking - Fighting Against the Tells

Seven years before Stonewall, thirty years prior to Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell -

Activists Craig Rodwell and Randy Wicker, along with a small group of others, picketed New York City’s draft board offices in 1962. The political demonstration was done to highlight the unfair persecution of gay and lesbian soldiers in the United States Military and dishonorable discharges being issued to veterans. The protesters also called out the unjust policy of releasing draft-age men’s information of their sexual orientation to employers.

image

WRITTEN IN THE STARS

LGBTQ* Symbols, Slogans and Pride History

(Lesbian) STAR SYMBOLS

The Blue Star: used by lesbians in the mid-twentieth century.

Lesbians would often sport a blue star tattoo (five-pointed and often on their bicep). It was easily covered from certain passers-by and could be shown to others in-the-know.

             blue                              gold     

The Gold Star: used within the lesbian community to symbolize a lesbian who has never had sexual relations with someone who identifies as male.    

LGBTQ* History, Insight, Stories, and Media Representation

Transgender History (via the Radio)

Interview + photos from the transgender archive in Houston, TX.

This is an on-air interview with Daniel Williams, member of the Board of Directors for the Transgender Foundation of America on 90.1 FM KPFT in Houston, TX. The interview took place on Friday, August 27, 2010.

LGBTQ* History and Vintage Photographs You Should Know
Greenwich Village Drag Ball circa 1920s (photograph)
Balls were elaborate festivals for the who’s who of society. They were also the queerest scene in town, bringing forth drag performers, the lgbtq* community, celebrating sexual identity and gender expression.

LGBTQ* History and Vintage Photographs You Should Know

Greenwich Village Drag Ball circa 1920s (photograph)

Balls were elaborate festivals for the who’s who of society. They were also the queerest scene in town, bringing forth drag performers, the lgbtq* community, celebrating sexual identity and gender expression.

Oct 9
LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar
Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artists and Sexual Renegade
—By Justin Springs
(From Publisher’s Weekly)
Life in the closet proves boisterous indeed in this biography of an iconic figure of the pre-Stonewall gay demimonde. Steward (1909–1993) was an English professor, a novelist who wrote both well-received literary fiction and gay porn, a confidant of Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder, a furtive but exuberant erotic adventurer whose taste for sailors, rough trade, and violent sadomasochism endeared him to sex researcher Alfred Kinsey; later in life, he became Phil Sparrow, official tattoo artist of the Oakland, Calif., Hell’s Angels. Spring (Paul Cadmus) fleshes out this colorful story by quoting copiously from his subject’s highly literate journals and sex diaries—his Stud File contained entries on trysts with everyone from Rudolph Valentino to Rock Hudson—which afford an unabashed account of Steward’s erotic picaresque and the yearnings that drove it. (His swerve from academia into tattooing, with its mix of physical pain and proximity to nubile male flesh, was essentially a fetish turned into a business.) Spring’s sympathetic and entertaining story of a life registers the limitations imposed on homosexuals by a repressive society, but also celebrates the creativity and daring with which Steward tested them..Copyright © Reed Business Information

LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar

Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artists and Sexual Renegade

—By Justin Springs

(From Publisher’s Weekly)

Life in the closet proves boisterous indeed in this biography of an iconic figure of the pre-Stonewall gay demimonde. Steward (1909–1993) was an English professor, a novelist who wrote both well-received literary fiction and gay porn, a confidant of Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder, a furtive but exuberant erotic adventurer whose taste for sailors, rough trade, and violent sadomasochism endeared him to sex researcher Alfred Kinsey; later in life, he became Phil Sparrow, official tattoo artist of the Oakland, Calif., Hell’s Angels. Spring (Paul Cadmus) fleshes out this colorful story by quoting copiously from his subject’s highly literate journals and sex diaries—his Stud File contained entries on trysts with everyone from Rudolph Valentino to Rock Hudson—which afford an unabashed account of Steward’s erotic picaresque and the yearnings that drove it. (His swerve from academia into tattooing, with its mix of physical pain and proximity to nubile male flesh, was essentially a fetish turned into a business.) Spring’s sympathetic and entertaining story of a life registers the limitations imposed on homosexuals by a repressive society, but also celebrates the creativity and daring with which Steward tested them..
Copyright © Reed Business Information

Oct 9
LGBTQ* People and Events You Should Know 
John Lawrence — Lawrence V. Texas 

LGBTQ* People and Events You Should Know 

John Lawrence — Lawrence V. Texas 

Oct 9
LGBTQ* Books and Love Letters You May Have Missed
Empty without You: The Intimate Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt & Lorena Hickok
by Rodger Streitmatter (Editor), Eleanor Roosevelt
In 1978, more than 3,500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were discovered by archivists. Although the most explicit letters had been burned (Lorena told Eleanor’s daughter, “Your mother wasn’t always so very discreet in her letters to me”), the find was still electrifying enough to create controversy about the nature of the women’s relationship. Historian Rodger Streitmatter has transcribed and annotated more than 300 of those letters—published here for the first time—and put them within the context of the lives of these two extraordinary women, allowing us to understand the role of this remarkable friendship in Roosevelt’s transformation into a crusading First Lady. (text source)
                                 
 
(headline photo source)
 
 

LGBTQ* Books and Love Letters You May Have Missed

Empty without You: The Intimate Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt & Lorena Hickok

by Rodger Streitmatter (Editor)Eleanor Roosevelt

In 1978, more than 3,500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were discovered by archivists. Although the most explicit letters had been burned (Lorena told Eleanor’s daughter, “Your mother wasn’t always so very discreet in her letters to me”), the find was still electrifying enough to create controversy about the nature of the women’s relationship. Historian Rodger Streitmatter has transcribed and annotated more than 300 of those letters—published here for the first time—and put them within the context of the lives of these two extraordinary women, allowing us to understand the role of this remarkable friendship in Roosevelt’s transformation into a crusading First Lady. (text source)

                                 image

 
 
 
Oct 9

LGBTQ* Authors and Rants (You May Have Missed)

Nicola Griffith answers, ” Why is Hild…”

(source of text below)

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2013

Hild’s sexuality

I’ve been asked this often enough that it’s time to be clear: Hild is not straight.

Interviewers and reviewers have already asked me: So why is Hild a lesbian?

I say: First, she’s bisexual. Second, why the fuck not?

I am tired of having to have a reason for characters being queer. When my first agent told me that my proposal for Slow River was “not a selling outline,” I asked her to explain. She said, “Well, why does Lore [the protagonist] have to have a girlfriend?” I said, “Because she’s a dyke.” And fired her.

Nearly twenty years later Slow River is still in print. It won awards. It got translated into several languages. In the end, readers don’t care who gets naked with whom. They care about the story, the people, the setting. They care about the writing.

We should not have explain why our characters are queer. Or why they’re not. People are just people; they are who they are and love who they love. Sometimes that changes. Sexuality can be surprisingly fluid.

I’m not just talking to straight people here, either. I’m also tired of hearing from quiltbag folk that “No one will publish our stuff because it’s queer.” Bullshit. I’ve never had a moment’s trouble placing my fiction and it’s pretty queer.

Wake up, people. In fiction, it doesn’t matter if your characters are queer or straight, neither or both. What counts is whether it’s any good.

Go write something great. Go read something great. Go review something great. When it comes to fictional sex, never apologize, never explain.

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Nicola Griffith’s Blog

Check your local bookstore or library for HILD today.