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Posts tagged with "insight"

 

LGBTQ* Theory Books (You May Want) To Know

  • Feminism is Queer: The Intimate Connection between Queer and Feminist Theory - Mimi Marinucci
  • Mad for Foucault: Rethinking the Foundations of Queer Theory (Gender and Culture) - Lynne Huffer

  • Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity - Judith Butler
  • Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics, and Literature (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies) - Qwo-Li Driskill (Editor), Chris Finley (Editor), Brian Joseph Gilley (Editor), Scott Lauria Morgensen (Editor)

  • Please Select Your Gender: From the Invention of Hysteria to the Democratizing of Transgenderism - Patricia Gherovici 

     

  • Queer Cowboys: And Other Erotic Male Friendships in Nineteenth-Century American Literature - Chris Packard

     

  • Aberrations In Black: Toward A Queer Of Color Critique (Critical American Studies) - Roderick A. Ferguson

     

  • Queer Girls in Class (Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education) - Lori Horvitz 
Mar 6

Dapper and Fashion Insight 101

Birchbox’s “How To: Take Your Own Measurements for a Suit” 

LGBTQ* Statistics and Graphs


(source - Philly Mag)

Assistance/Hotlines:
  • US Hotlines:
  • Depression Hotline: 1-630-482-9696
  • Suicide Hotline: 1-800-784-8433
  • LifeLine: 1-800-273-8255
  • Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386
  • Sexuality Support: 1-800-246-7743
  • Eating Disorders Hotline: 1-847-831-3438
  • Rape and Sexual Assault: 1-800-656-4673
  • Grief Support: 1-650-321-5272
  • Runaway: 1-800-843-5200, 1-800-843-5678, 1-800-621-4000
  • Exhale: After Abortion Hotline/Pro-Voice: 1-866-4394253
  • Child Abuse: 1-800-422-4453
  • UK Hotlines:
  • Samaritans (for any problem): 08457909090 e-mail jo@samaritans.org
  • Childline (for anyone under 18 with any problem): 08001111
  • Mind infoline (mental health information): 0300 123 3393 e-mail: info@mind.org.uk
  • Mind legal advice (for people who need mental-health related legal advice): 0300 466 6463 legal@mind.org.uk
  • b-eat eating disorder support: 0845 634 14 14 (only open Mon-Fri 10.30am-8.30pm and Saturday 1pm-4.30pm) e-mail: help@b-eat.co.uk
  • b-eat youthline (for under 25’s with eating disorders): 08456347650 (open Mon-Fri 4.30pm - 8.30pm, Saturday 1pm-4.30pm)
  • Cruse Bereavement Care: 08444779400 e-mail: helpline@cruse.org.uk
  • Frank (information and advice on drugs): 0800776600
  • Drinkline: 0800 9178282
  • Rape Crisis England & Wales: 0808 802 9999 1(open 2 - 2.30pm 7 - 9.30pm) e-mail info@rapecrisis.org.uk
  • Rape Crisis Scotland: 08088 01 03 02 every day, 6pm to midnight
  • Italian Hotlines:
  • Telefono Amico (for support in case of depression, solitude, all kind of emotional needs):199 284 284 (every day, 10am - 24pm)
  • Telefono Azzurro (for kids and teenagers): 1 96 96 (24h a day, 365 days a year); 114 (for immediate danger, 24h every day)
  • Antiviolenza Donne (for women victims of any sort of violence): 1522 (24h every day)
  • Alcolisti Anonimi (Alcoholics anonymous): 06 66.36.620
Sep 5

Personal Note:  Over the last few weeks I have had many heavy heart and deep tissue conversations about things we push away and try not to talk about. I never repost from my personal page but I want to pass this on to many of you.

Please remember, if you are having a rough month, week, day, hour, minute, moment:

You Are Loved(!), You Will Be Missed(!), We Need You Here(!)

You are not the only person who has felt those infinite seconds of everything in a blender of nothing. 

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

The Trevor Project Call 866-488-7386 (24/7)

National Domestic Violence Hotline Call 1-800-799-7233

Keep On, Keeping On!

—Rebecca

knowrq:

Poem: Human The Death Dance by Buddy Wakefield

Human the Death Dance
by Buddy Wakefield
November 15, 2006


On the face of her phone
Wileen programs a message to herself
so that when the alarm clock rings
the screen flashes:
EVERY DAY IS ONE DAY LESS.
EVERY DAY IS ONE DAY LESS.


For some people
happiness
it’s just a reduction in suffering.


Jordan.
Jordan tattoos the words
FORGIVE ME
in thick black letters
down the inside of his arm
so that when he looks at his wrist
he will remember not to hate himself so much.


What he keeps forgetting
is that there is life after survival.


After Dave left
Mary started sticking her face
between the film projector
and the movie screen
so that when the credits roll
she still gets to be somebody.


Whenever Tara’s past comes back she mashes
chalk into the sidewalk
until her knuckles bleed.
She scribbles and scrapes
scribbles and scrapes
till the words take shape
and this is what they say

I wanna die muther****ers
die DIE muther****ers
hold tight if I love ya
cause it might not last long.

Y’all, we’re all gonna die.
That’s the exciting part.
It’s learning how to live for a living,
that’s the tricky stitch.


Just ask Denise
whose family taught her when she came into this world
that Family equals Love
so Denise took that **** seriously
but after a lifetime of craving acceptance from their cruelty
she now finds herself jamming Polaroid pictures of these people into her typewriter
and pounding out the last letter of the word mercy
over and over and over again.
She strikes the key Y.
Y? Y? Y?Y?Y?


The answer?
The answer comes in the form of a handwritten letter from the moon.
It reads:
This is brutally beautiful.
So are we.
This is endless.
So are we.
We can heal this.
Signed,
Crater Face
P.S. See me for who I am.
We’ve got work to do.


But my father
he didn’t read moon
he didn’t speak moon
and he didn’t write moon
so there was no letter found next to his body in the garage
when he chose to leave this place on purpose
without saying where he was goin’ or why.
There are still days you can catch me
tape recording eternal silence
and playing it backwards for an empty room
so I can listen to his dieing wish
shh.


Yes,
it’s true,
the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree,
but my family tree
was in an orchard on a hill
that rolled me to the river
and that river
ripped me through the rapids
and those rapids
rushed me into this moment
right here right now
with you
at the mouth.
This is my church.
And if church is a house of healing
hallelujah welcome
come in as you are
have a look around
stay out of the porn.
There are massive stacks of bad choices in my backyard.
Haven’t finished cleaning the place up
but I’m workin’ on it
and clearly I have not yet reached enlightenment
for more than a fleeting moment
but I’m tryin’
and I found somethin’ here I want ya to have.
It’s not much
just a story
but it’s all I’ve got
so take it.


It’s called Dillon.
Dillon’s drug of choice was more
so Dillon took more
and more and more and more
until the day he woke up
babbling in a pool of his own traffic jam
realizing he was killing off the best parts of himself
and claiming he could read peoples’ skin.
When Dillon looked down at his heart flap
the skin read Boy, go find your spine and ride it outta here.


Wileen’s gut said Day 1.
Jordan’s arms were FULLY FORGIVEN.

Mary’s face: The Endless.
Tara’s knuckles: Healing.
Denise’s fingertip said C?
C. C. C.C.C.

And my smile
Dillon said my smile it said Fix it
so I came here to the mouth of the river
to look at my own reflection in the moonlight
and see what it says for myself
down my whole body
where it is written
in the skin
says

P.S.
See me for who I am.
We’ve got work to do.

As for Crater Face,
I can’t speak for him.
His skin
is a brutally beautiful
handwritten letter
from the sun.
Jul 9
Trans* Pronouns 101
(following text from Sundance Channel’s SUNfiltered *LINK* from blogger Alexis Handwerker)
Nobody wants to be that person in a social situation. You know, the one who gets their pronouns all wrong? There you are in a room with people identifying as ze, they or hir and it doesn’t even occur to you to ask. You make a few assumptions about peoples’ genders, are met with blank stares or even worse, and pretty soon you’re in a corner all alone. Well, we’re here to help you not be that person.
If you’re not sure what went wrong, but are sure you don’t want to be that person in any room, then it may be time for you to update your gender and pronoun vocabulary. Avoiding a social faux pas and respecting a person’s ability to identify themselves, will ensure you get an invite to the next function.  Pronouns are a basic building block of language that indicate the gender of the person you’re referring to. Traditionally, pronouns come in he/him or she/her, and are determined based on what’s assigned at birth. For example, when somebody is born and the doctor says, “It’s a girl! She’s beautiful. What will you name her?”Cisgender folks are those who feel their bodies are aligned with their gender assigned at birth, which is the experience most supported by society.  So, for many cis folks, the story of their gender ends right there, as does their thinking about the appropriate label in which to address a person.
But the two-party system of pronouns is outdated, as there are a range of people whose gender stories are more complex. Finding self-descriptive language that feels right can be a tricky process, and one that only the individual can determine best. Some transgender folks identify as male or female, though it’s the opposite gender of the one assigned at birth. Genderqueers don’t subscribe to the idea of only two genders and may feel more comfortable somewhere in between. Bigenders identify as male and female and some First Nations folks embody both feminine and masculine spirits. Agenders identify as no gender at all. Luckily, there are more neutral personal pronoun options now, including they/their, ze/hir, ey/eir and the newborn, Swedish ‘hen’ . Recognition of diverse gender identities has a long history around the world, and neutral pronouns are language’s way of catching up.
So, where does this leave you? When you’re mingling at a party, heading up a meeting, or in school, just be mindful of the potential for multiple genders in the room. If you’re unsure of someone’s preferred pronouns, don’t be afraid to ASK. Once you learn them, use them every time, like you would for anyone else. Not being that person can be as simple as that.
Thank for asking!
Want to learn more? Check out:
Melissa Harris-Perry hosts an awesome show on MSNBC. Watch her recent episode on being transgender in America.
Queer women of color talk gender, during Episode 2 of the phenomenal web series The Peculiar Kind.
This interactive map lets you learn the names, history and culture of different gender identities around the world.
Transgender People of Color Coalition work together to address issues that impact trans men and women of color. Get involved!
Genderfork is an amazing online, volunteer run community for people across the gender spectrum to connect. Here you’ll find photos, words of encouragement and opportunities to make friends.
BLITZ is a comprehensive nationwide resource guide and online community for all people under the transgender umbrella and their allies.

Trans* Pronouns 101

(following text from Sundance Channel’s SUNfiltered *LINK* from blogger Alexis Handwerker)

Nobody wants to be that person in a social situation. You know, the one who gets their pronouns all wrong? There you are in a room with people identifying as zethey or hir and it doesn’t even occur to you to ask. You make a few assumptions about peoples’ genders, are met with blank stares or even worse, and pretty soon you’re in a corner all alone. Well, we’re here to help you not be that person.

If you’re not sure what went wrong, but are sure you don’t want to be that person in any room, then it may be time for you to update your gender and pronoun vocabulary. Avoiding a social faux pas and respecting a person’s ability to identify themselves, will ensure you get an invite to the next function.  Pronouns are a basic building block of language that indicate the gender of the person you’re referring to. Traditionally, pronouns come in he/him or she/her, and are determined based on what’s assigned at birth. For example, when somebody is born and the doctor says, “It’s a girl! She’s beautiful. What will you name her?”Cisgender folks are those who feel their bodies are aligned with their gender assigned at birth, which is the experience most supported by society.  So, for many cis folks, the story of their gender ends right there, as does their thinking about the appropriate label in which to address a person.

But the two-party system of pronouns is outdated, as there are a range of people whose gender stories are more complex. Finding self-descriptive language that feels right can be a tricky process, and one that only the individual can determine best. Some transgender folks identify as male or female, though it’s the opposite gender of the one assigned at birth. Genderqueers don’t subscribe to the idea of only two genders and may feel more comfortable somewhere in between. Bigenders identify as male and female and some First Nations folks embody both feminine and masculine spiritsAgenders identify as no gender at all. Luckily, there are more neutral personal pronoun options now, including they/their, ze/hir, ey/eir and the newborn, Swedish ‘hen’ . Recognition of diverse gender identities has a long history around the world, and neutral pronouns are language’s way of catching up.

So, where does this leave you? When you’re mingling at a party, heading up a meeting, or in school, just be mindful of the potential for multiple genders in the room. If you’re unsure of someone’s preferred pronouns, don’t be afraid to ASK. Once you learn them, use them every time, like you would for anyone else. Not being that person can be as simple as that.

Thank for asking!

Want to learn more? Check out:

  • Melissa Harris-Perry hosts an awesome show on MSNBC. Watch her recent episode on being transgender in America.
  • Queer women of color talk gender, during Episode 2 of the phenomenal web series The Peculiar Kind.
  • This interactive map lets you learn the names, history and culture of different gender identities around the world.
  • Transgender People of Color Coalition work together to address issues that impact trans men and women of color. Get involved!
  • Genderfork is an amazing online, volunteer run community for people across the gender spectrum to connect. Here you’ll find photos, words of encouragement and opportunities to make friends.
  • BLITZ is a comprehensive nationwide resource guide and online community for all people under the transgender umbrella and their allies.
LGBTQ* Insight and Ideas
(following text from PflagWestchester)
An Effective Ally…   
• Respects confidentiality.  
• Allows individuals to lead the direction of the conversation, lets them 
make their own choices, and listens, listens, listens. 
• Talks to LGBT family, friends, and coworkers.  
• Avoids assumptions and stereotyping.  
• Tries using gender-neutral terms when talking about significant others, 
spouses, and partners. 
• Expects to make some mistakes, but doesn’t use them as an excuse 
for not acting.  
• Acknowledges how homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism have 
operated in their life.  
• Educates themself about issues facing LGBT people.  
• Has a sense of humor.  
• Knows when and how to refer somebody to outside help, and to get 
professional adult intervention when necessary.  
An Effective Ally Doesn’t …
• Have all the answers.  
• Try to “fix” problems  
• Proceed with an interaction if boundaries or personal safety have been 
violated.  
Photo from: NYU’s Ally Week. Copied from: Toronto District School Board’s website

LGBTQ* Insight and Ideas

(following text from PflagWestchester)

An Effective Ally…   

• Respects confidentiality.  

• Allows individuals to lead the direction of the conversation, lets them 

make their own choices, and listens, listens, listens. 

• Talks to LGBT family, friends, and coworkers.  

• Avoids assumptions and stereotyping.  

• Tries using gender-neutral terms when talking about significant others, 

spouses, and partners. 

• Expects to make some mistakes, but doesn’t use them as an excuse 

for not acting.  

• Acknowledges how homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism have 

operated in their life.  

• Educates themself about issues facing LGBT people.  

• Has a sense of humor.  

• Knows when and how to refer somebody to outside help, and to get 

professional adult intervention when necessary.  

An Effective Ally Doesn’t …

• Have all the answers.  

• Try to “fix” problems  

• Proceed with an interaction if boundaries or personal safety have been 

violated.  

Photo from: NYU’s Ally Week. Copied from: Toronto District School Board’s website

LGBTQ* Privileges (or lacking privileges) You Should Be Aware Of
30+ Examples of Cisgender Privilege
(following text from: Its Pronounced Metrosexual )
Following is a list of cisgender identity privileges.  If you’re not familiar with the term, “cisgender” means having a biological sex that matches your gender identity and expression, resulting in other people accurately perceiving your gender.  If you are cisgender, listed below are benefits that result from your alignment of identity and perceived identity.  If you identify as cisgender, there’s a good chance you’ve never thought about these things.  Try and be more cognizant and you’ll start to realize how much work we have to do in order to make things better for the transgender folks who don’t have access to these privileges.  If you’re unsure of what it means to be “transgender” you can read about it in our gender identity guide.
Use public restrooms without fear of verbal abuse, physical intimidation, or arrest
Use public facilities such as gym locker rooms and store changing rooms without stares, fear, or anxiety.
Strangers don’t assume they can ask you what your genitals look like and how you have sex.
Your validity as a man/woman/human is not based on how much surgery you’ve had or how well you “pass” as non-transgender.
You have the ability to walk through the world and generally blend-in, not being constantly stared or gawked at, whispered about, pointed at, or laughed at because of your gender expression.
You can access gender exclusive spaces such as the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, Greek Life, or Take Back the Night and not be excluded due to your trans status.
Strangers call you by the name you provide, and don’t ask what your “real name” [birth name] is and then assume that they have a right to call you by that name.
You can reasonably assume that your ability to acquire a job, rent an apartment, or secure a loan will not be denied on the basis of your gender identity/expression.
You have the ability to flirt, engage in courtship, or form a relationship and not fear that your biological status may be cause for rejection or attack, nor will it cause your partner to question their sexual orientation.
If you end up in the emergency room, you do not have to worry that your gender will keep you from receiving appropriate treatment, or that all of your medical issues will be seen as a result of your gender.
Your identity is not considered a mental pathology (“gender identity disorder” in the DSM IV) by the psychological and medical establishments.
You have the ability to not worry about being placed in a sex-segregated detention center, holding facility, jail or prison that is incongruent with your identity.
You have the ability to not be profiled on the street as a sex worker because of your gender expression.
You are not required to undergo an extensive psychological evaluation in order to receive basic medical care.
You do not have to defend you right to be a part of “Queer,” and gays and lesbians will not try to exclude you from “their” equal  rights movement because of your gender identity (or any equality movement, including feminist rights).
If you are murdered (or have any crime committed against you), your gender expression will not be used as a justification for your murder (“gay panic”) nor as a reason to coddle the perpetrators.
You can easily find role models and mentors to emulate who share your identity.
Hollywood accurately depicts people of your gender in films and television, and does not solely make  your identity the focus of a dramatic storyline, or the punchline for a joke.
Be able to assume that everyone you encounter will understand your identity, and not think you’re confused, misled, or hell-bound when you reveal it to them.
Being able to purchase clothes that match your gender identity without being refused service/mocked by staff or questioned on your genitals.
Being able to purchase shoes that fit your gender expression without having to order them in special sizes or asking someone to custom-make them.
No stranger checking your identification or drivers license will ever insult or glare at you because your name or sex does not match the sex they believed you to be based on your gender expression.
You can reasonably assume that you will not be denied services at a hospital, bank, or other institution because the staff does not believe the gender marker on your ID card to match your gender identity.
Having your gender as an option on a form.
Being able to tick a box on a form without someone disagreeing, and telling you not to lie.  Yes, this happens.
Not fearing interactions with police officers due to your gender identity.
Being able to go to places with friends on a whim knowing there will be bathrooms there you can use.
You don’t have to convince your parents of your true gender and/or have to earn your parents’ and siblings’ love and respect all over again.
You don’t have to remind your extended family over and over to use proper gender pronouns (e.g., after transitioning).
You don’t have to deal with old photographs that did not reflect who you truly are.
Knowing that if you’re dating someone they aren’t just looking to satisfy a curiosity or kink pertaining to your gender identity (e.g., the “novelty” of having sex with a trans- person).
Being able to pretend that anatomy and gender are irrevocably entwined when having the “boy parts and girl parts” talk with children, instead of explaining the actual complexity of the issue 

LGBTQ* Privileges (or lacking privileges) You Should Be Aware Of

30+ Examples of Cisgender Privilege

(following text from: Its Pronounced Metrosexual )

Following is a list of cisgender identity privileges.  If you’re not familiar with the term, “cisgender” means having a biological sex that matches your gender identity and expression, resulting in other people accurately perceiving your gender.  If you are cisgender, listed below are benefits that result from your alignment of identity and perceived identity.  If you identify as cisgender, there’s a good chance you’ve never thought about these things.  Try and be more cognizant and you’ll start to realize how much work we have to do in order to make things better for the transgender folks who don’t have access to these privileges.  If you’re unsure of what it means to be “transgender” you can read about it in our gender identity guide.

  1. Use public restrooms without fear of verbal abuse, physical intimidation, or arrest
  2. Use public facilities such as gym locker rooms and store changing rooms without stares, fear, or anxiety.
  3. Strangers don’t assume they can ask you what your genitals look like and how you have sex.
  4. Your validity as a man/woman/human is not based on how much surgery you’ve had or how well you “pass” as non-transgender.
  5. You have the ability to walk through the world and generally blend-in, not being constantly stared or gawked at, whispered about, pointed at, or laughed at because of your gender expression.
  6. You can access gender exclusive spaces such as the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, Greek Life, or Take Back the Night and not be excluded due to your trans status.
  7. Strangers call you by the name you provide, and don’t ask what your “real name” [birth name] is and then assume that they have a right to call you by that name.
  8. You can reasonably assume that your ability to acquire a job, rent an apartment, or secure a loan will not be denied on the basis of your gender identity/expression.
  9. You have the ability to flirt, engage in courtship, or form a relationship and not fear that your biological status may be cause for rejection or attack, nor will it cause your partner to question their sexual orientation.
  10. If you end up in the emergency room, you do not have to worry that your gender will keep you from receiving appropriate treatment, or that all of your medical issues will be seen as a result of your gender.
  11. Your identity is not considered a mental pathology (“gender identity disorder” in the DSM IV) by the psychological and medical establishments.
  12. You have the ability to not worry about being placed in a sex-segregated detention center, holding facility, jail or prison that is incongruent with your identity.
  13. You have the ability to not be profiled on the street as a sex worker because of your gender expression.
  14. You are not required to undergo an extensive psychological evaluation in order to receive basic medical care.
  15. You do not have to defend you right to be a part of “Queer,” and gays and lesbians will not try to exclude you from “their” equal  rights movement because of your gender identity (or any equality movement, including feminist rights).
  16. If you are murdered (or have any crime committed against you), your gender expression will not be used as a justification for your murder (“gay panic”) nor as a reason to coddle the perpetrators.
  17. You can easily find role models and mentors to emulate who share your identity.
  18. Hollywood accurately depicts people of your gender in films and television, and does not solely make  your identity the focus of a dramatic storyline, or the punchline for a joke.
  19. Be able to assume that everyone you encounter will understand your identity, and not think you’re confused, misled, or hell-bound when you reveal it to them.
  20. Being able to purchase clothes that match your gender identity without being refused service/mocked by staff or questioned on your genitals.
  21. Being able to purchase shoes that fit your gender expression without having to order them in special sizes or asking someone to custom-make them.
  22. No stranger checking your identification or drivers license will ever insult or glare at you because your name or sex does not match the sex they believed you to be based on your gender expression.
  23. You can reasonably assume that you will not be denied services at a hospital, bank, or other institution because the staff does not believe the gender marker on your ID card to match your gender identity.
  24. Having your gender as an option on a form.
  25. Being able to tick a box on a form without someone disagreeing, and telling you not to lie.  Yes, this happens.
  26. Not fearing interactions with police officers due to your gender identity.
  27. Being able to go to places with friends on a whim knowing there will be bathrooms there you can use.
  28. You don’t have to convince your parents of your true gender and/or have to earn your parents’ and siblings’ love and respect all over again.
  29. You don’t have to remind your extended family over and over to use proper gender pronouns (e.g., after transitioning).
  30. You don’t have to deal with old photographs that did not reflect who you truly are.
  31. Knowing that if you’re dating someone they aren’t just looking to satisfy a curiosity or kink pertaining to your gender identity (e.g., the “novelty” of having sex with a trans- person).
  32. Being able to pretend that anatomy and gender are irrevocably entwined when having the “boy parts and girl parts” talk with children, instead of explaining the actual complexity of the issue 

LBGTQ* Pride History and Insight

Forty Years After Stonewall


Youtube Discription: Historian Tim McCarthy, director of Human Rights and Social Movements program at Harvard, sees pros and cons to using the riots as a point of origin for the gay rights movement.


Personal Note:

I cannot agree more with his discussion about the lacking understanding and education of lgbtq* history. This blog started because I wanted to push my understanding deeper. This history is really important for me. Had I not started KNOWhomo’s page, I may have never learned about Lisa Ben typing and creating the first lesbian publication in the US, or Henry Gerber’s work in Chicago which predates the Mattachine Society, or The Black Cat Tavern or Compton Cafeteria Riots which both occurred BEFORE Stonewall.

This is my history as a queer* woman. I have to seek it. It isn’t supplied in grade school (or almost any college) textbooks. It is very fragmented. 

Should there be a push for more dialogue/discussions/history?

What do you think?

LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips

Lorraine Hansberry (you can read more about her HERE) 
* African-American Playwright, Author and Speech Writer
* Most known work: A Raisin in the Sun

LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips

Lorraine Hansberry (you can read more about her HERE

* African-American Playwright, Author and Speech Writer

* Most known work: A Raisin in the Sun

Apr 6
LGBTQ* Website, Tumblr, Advice, Insight, Comedy, Lip-Sync,
(ALL OF THE THINGS) You Should Know
Kristin and Dannielle give advice to those who are confused about sexuality, gender-identity, dating, falling in love, or even dressing up like Super Woman. They also visit high schools and college campuses nationwide to help bring change and awareness while keeping everyone laughing. (from website)

Also, Kristin and Dannielle are currently touring. If you can make an event, I highly recommend doing so. (Personal Note: If you are around the western Virginia area, I will be attending the Hollins evening. Come say hey and we can laugh and listen together.)
APR 16 The Berkshire School: Sheffield, MA 9:00am, Private Event
APR 16 Endicott College: Beverly, MA 7:00pm, Free Public Event 
APR 24 James Madison University: Harrisonburg, VA 7:00pm, Free Public Event
APR 25 Hollins University: Roanoke, VA 7:00pm, Free Public Event
MAY 4 SUNY Oswego: Oswego, NY Private Event
JUNE 10 Capital Pride: Washington, DC Check 
JUNE 24 NYC Pride: New York, NY

LGBTQ* Website, Tumblr, Advice, Insight, Comedy, Lip-Sync,

(ALL OF THE THINGS) You Should Know

Kristin and Dannielle give advice to those who are confused about sexuality, gender-identity, dating, falling in love, or even dressing up like Super Woman. They also visit high schools and college campuses nationwide to help bring change and awareness while keeping everyone laughing. (from website)


Also, Kristin and Dannielle are currently touring. If you can make an event, I highly recommend doing so. (Personal Note: If you are around the western Virginia area, I will be attending the Hollins evening. Come say hey and we can laugh and listen together.)

APR 16 The Berkshire School: Sheffield, MA 9:00am, Private Event

APR 16 Endicott College: Beverly, MA 7:00pm, Free Public Event 

APR 24 James Madison University: Harrisonburg, VA 7:00pm, Free Public Event

APR 25 Hollins University: Roanoke, VA 7:00pm, Free Public Event

MAY 4 SUNY Oswego: Oswego, NY Private Event

JUNE 10 Capital Pride: Washington, DC Check 

JUNE 24 NYC Pride: New York, NY


LGBTQ* Blogs and Writers You Should Know
Exploring Gender
Cael, a transman living in Western Virginia, writes about gender, sexuality, legality, and life in his weekly blog which is part of the webpage/column Lesbelib.
“My life lately has been a transition in itself: new job, new roommate, new schedule, new prospects for my future. There hasn’t been a lot of time for thinking or reflecting on my transition, only being satisfied with being the guy I am at work, at home, and with my friends. It is rare now for someone to use the wrong pronouns or the wrong name. There are more steps to transitioning, though, than just living as a man.”
Cael’s most recent Exploring Gender (Transitioning and Therapists) can be read HERE.
Cael’s personal Tumblr site can be found HERE.

LGBTQ* Blogs and Writers You Should Know

Exploring Gender

Cael, a transman living in Western Virginia, writes about gender, sexuality, legality, and life in his weekly blog which is part of the webpage/column Lesbelib.

My life lately has been a transition in itself: new job, new roommate, new schedule, new prospects for my future. There hasn’t been a lot of time for thinking or reflecting on my transition, only being satisfied with being the guy I am at work, at home, and with my friends. It is rare now for someone to use the wrong pronouns or the wrong name. There are more steps to transitioning, though, than just living as a man.”

Cael’s most recent Exploring Gender (Transitioning and Therapists) can be read HERE.

Cael’s personal Tumblr site can be found HERE.

LGBTQ* Tumblr Websites You Should Know
Soffa Support - Tumblr resource for significant others, friends, families, and allies of the trans* community. Questions, submissions, articles, insight, advice, and discussions about the trans* community are shared here with respect and consideration.

LGBTQ* Tumblr Websites You Should Know

Soffa Support - Tumblr resource for significant others, friends, families, and allies of the trans* community. Questions, submissions, articles, insight, advice, and discussions about the trans* community are shared here with respect and consideration.