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Posts tagged with "genderqueer"

LGBTQ* Theatre Blog You May Have Missed: "Don't Call Me Ma'am: On the Politics of Trans Casting" by MJ Kaufman

I think that casting trans actors in trans roles is important not only because we need to make our bodies visible, but because many transpeople’s lives are materially impacted by transphobia. ….” 

Read More HERE

LGBTQ* Artists and Photographers You Should Keep On Your Radar

Photographer REBECCA SWAN

Queer artist Rebecca Swan from Aotearoa, New Zealand reexamines gender and the way the body is captured through a photography. Many of the individuals who share their bodies with Swan’s camera identify outside of the gender binary, including many members of the trans* community. Swan’s book ASSUME NOTHING follows twenty five people as they pose, expose, and share their most intimate truths with the camera. 

Photo Sources

1. Source — “Dred”

2. Souce

3. Source — Rebecca Swan, Photographer

4. Source — “Reshma Valliappan”

5. Source — “Mark”

6. Source — “Shane”

7. Source — “Merge”

Jun 5

KNOWhomo Past Posts and their Relevance Today

Pride Flags You (Might?) See and What They Mean

 

Flags of Our Family

With flags being flown across the country, accompanied by dedicated voices, strength, and compassion, we provide a helpful history of some of the colors waving above our heads.

(for more information, check out #Flag)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Pride Flags You Should Know

#1: LGBTQ* Pride (**first flag in 1978 with 8 colors represented Lesbian/Gay culture)

#2: Bisexual Pride

#3: Pansexual Pride

#4: Asexual/Ace Pride

#5: Genderqueer Pride (click HERE for more information)

#6: Intersex Pride

#7: Trans* Pride

#8: Lipstick Lesbian Pride

#9: Bear Pride (click HERE for more information)

#10: Leather Pride

May 3

What’s In Your Asterisk?

We would like to create a vlog with (most) of the labels/self-identifications that get crammed together in LGBTQ*. In order to do this, we’d like to ask you what does the Asterisk (*) in LGBTQ* mean to you.

Should you not want to share publicly below, please just send us an anonymous ask.

KNOWhomo Repost:

Flags of Our Family

With flags being flown across the country, accompanied by dedicated voices, strength, and compassion, we provide a helpful history of some of the colors waving above our heads.

(for more information, check out #Flag)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Pride Flags You Should Know

#1: LGBTQ* Pride (**first flag in 1978 with 8 colors represented Lesbian/Gay culture)

#2: Bisexual Pride

#3: Pansexual Pride

#4: Asexual/Ace Pride

#5: Genderqueer Pride (click HERE for more information)

#6: Intersex Pride

#7: Trans* Pride

#8: Lipstick Lesbian Pride

#9: Bear Pride (click HERE for more information)

#10: Leather Pride

Feb 2
LGBTQ* Graphic Novels to Keep on Your Radar
(AKA, LGBTQ* graphic novels the KNOWhomo team is currently reading)

TRANSPOSES by Dylan Edwards
"Transposes will teach you something about what it means to have  a body and to feel desire. About what it means, in short, to be human." - Alison Bechdel From the foreword by the New York Times bestselling author of FUN HOME and ARE YOU MY MOTHER
TRANSPOSES separates gender from sexuality and illustrates six fascinating true stories of transgender men who also happen to be queer. The result is a laugh-out-loud, funny, heartbreaking, challenging, inventive, informative, and invites the reader to explore what truly makes a man a man. 
Interested? Read some of the first pages HERE.

Note from Rebecca: 
I ordered TRANSPOSES after running into it time and time again online. (I am an avid comic book and graphic novel reader.) I ordered it from NORTHWEST PRESS and had it in my hands within 2-3 days (at regular shipping price). If you are unfamiliar with NORTHWEST PRESS and enjoy queer graphic expression and fiction, I highly recommend spending some time on their site. 

LGBTQ* Graphic Novels to Keep on Your Radar

(AKA, LGBTQ* graphic novels the KNOWhomo team is currently reading)

TRANSPOSES by Dylan Edwards


"Transposes will teach you something about what it means to have  a body and to feel desire. About what it means, in short, to be human." - Alison Bechdel 
From the foreword by the New York Times bestselling author of FUN HOME and ARE YOU MY MOTHER

TRANSPOSES separates gender from sexuality and illustrates six fascinating true stories of transgender men who also happen to be queer. The result is a laugh-out-loud, funny, heartbreaking, challenging, inventive, informative, and invites the reader to explore what truly makes a man a man. 

Interested? Read some of the first pages HERE.


Note from Rebecca

I ordered TRANSPOSES after running into it time and time again online. (I am an avid comic book and graphic novel reader.) I ordered it from NORTHWEST PRESS and had it in my hands within 2-3 days (at regular shipping price). If you are unfamiliar with NORTHWEST PRESS and enjoy queer graphic expression and fiction, I highly recommend spending some time on their site. 

LGBTQ* Statistics And Graphs You Should See
Transgender Statistics (2012)
from No To Homophobia, Australia

LGBTQ* Statistics And Graphs You Should See

Transgender Statistics (2012)


from No To Homophobia, Australia

LGBTQ* Flags You Should Know


Sexual Orientation Subculture Flags

  1. Lipstick Lesbian Flag
  2. Leather Pride Flag
  3. Bear Pride Flag (previous post on Bear Pride)

Flags Representing Gender Identification

  1. GenderQueer Flag (GenderQueer Flag History)
  2. Intersex Flag (this flag should count for both birth sex and identifying gender - it is important to never assume someone’s birth sex or gender identity) 
  3. Transgender Flag (History of Trans* Flag)
Dec 3
BOOKS, Books Everywhere, and Finding a Queer* One for Me!
Are you going home for the Holidays? Do you finally have time to read things for pleasure again? Are you trying to come out to your friends and would like some help?
**Ok, to explain, I kept showing up to Feminist Theory (while I was in undergrad) with different Lesbian/Queer* texts until my adviser finally asked me if I needed to talk. I am the person who used book jackets to start conversations.
Back to the books! 
Be sure to check out the KNOWhomo Literature, Theory, and Graphic Novel pages. It’s always a great place to start.
Keep On, Keeping On!
-Rebecca
(Some of my personal collection shown above. If you’d like any information on any of those texts, please let me know.)
?

BOOKS, Books Everywhere, and Finding a Queer* One for Me!

Are you going home for the Holidays? Do you finally have time to read things for pleasure again? Are you trying to come out to your friends and would like some help?

**Ok, to explain, I kept showing up to Feminist Theory (while I was in undergrad) with different Lesbian/Queer* texts until my adviser finally asked me if I needed to talk. I am the person who used book jackets to start conversations.

Back to the books! 

Be sure to check out the KNOWhomo Literature, Theory, and Graphic Novel pages. It’s always a great place to start.

Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca

(Some of my personal collection shown above. If you’d like any information on any of those texts, please let me know.)

?

 LGBTQ* Infographics To Spark 1,000 Conversations

(click on photos to view in larger scale)

Reminder:

Transgender Day of Remembrance #TDOR - November 20, 2012


Some of the Above Graphics From:


Nov 4

LGBTQ* Full Documentary You  May Have Missed

GENDER REBEL 

Personal Note: This documentary features Ryan Sallans during the early stages of his transition. I remember watching it a few years ago, around the same time I was gearing up to launch KNOWhomo’s tumblr page. At the time I had no idea I would have the opportunity to talk to Ryan and get to know him through Tumblr, events, outreach, and a few emails back-and-forth. 

I highly recommend you check out his Tumblr page, his professional page, and read his autobiography SECOND SON.

-R.

ryansallans:

Gender Rebel Documentary

Back story from Ryan:

In 2005….when I first began my transition I ended up being part of the LOGO channel’s Real Momentum Series. The documentary I took part in was Gender Rebel. It use to be available to watch for free on LOGO…if folks haven’t watched it but would like to, I found the full version here.

As a side note: This documentary was one of the first of its kind to look at the term and identity “genderqueer” being one of the first….it doesn’t cover the term as it would be today. For me, I was questioning when I first contacted by the casting director and due to the strain that I had in my romantic relationship I was trying to compromise my identity…so I was testing out a genderqueer identity but discovered that didn’t fit me…this realization evolved as the crew was actually filming which makes for an interesting view of 1) identity development and 2) the conflict that can happen in a relationship that used to be lesbian-identified. 

So in short, I recommend watching the documentary for the individual journey of each person featured and not for the expectation that the term genderqueer will be explored. 

I also recognize that the characters are all Caucasian, this is due to the fact that other people cast decided not to participate when it was time for filming.  

LGBTQ* Videos You May Have Missed

The VlogBrothers’ Hank Green weighs in on “infinite shiny boxes.” (I also fall into a deeper infinite love for this man.)


phdougie:

If anyone would like to discuss gender and sexuality on YouTube right now, go ahead and watch the new vlogbrothers video. Tell me what you think about what Hank says and his commentary. 

Sep 1
LGBTQ* Ally Tips
Graphic from Trinity’s Q Soc (of Ireland)
Following text from UC Davis’ Trans* Ally Tips Page
Trans Ally Tips

SOME WAYS TO BE A GOOD TRANS ALLY…
•    Don’t ever out a transperson. This is dangerous to their safety & can invalidate their identity.  Likewise, be aware of your surroundings when discussing trans issues with a transperson. For their safety & comfort, they may prefer not to discuss these topics in public places or among strangers.•    Always use the pronouns & name the person wants you to use. If you’re unsure, ASK!  If you make a mistake, correct yourself, & politely (& subtly, if possible) correct others if they use the wrong pronoun.•    Ask when & where it’s safe to use their chosen name & pronouns (e.g., if a transperson is not out at home, ask them how you should refer to them around their family, etc). Don’t ask transpeople what their “real” name is (i.e., the one they were born with).  If you know their birth name, do not divulge it to others.  •    Instead of using prefixes like bio- or real- to designate that someone is not trans, use “non-trans” or the prefix “cis-”. Two reasons for this: one, using “real” or “bio” sets up a dichotomy in which transpeople are not considered “real” or “biological.”  Two, using the terms trans & non-trans or cis- alters the framework so that transpeople are the default rather than the Other.  Setting up trans as the norm can help make transphobia & gender privilege more obvious.•    Instead of saying someone was born a boy (or a girl), try saying they were assigned male at birth (or were female-assigned).  These terms recognize the difference between sex & gender, and emphasize the ways in which sex & gender are assigned to individuals at birth, rather than being innate, binary or immutable qualities.•    Don’t confuse gender with sexual preference.  Transpeople, like non-trans people, are straight, gay, bisexual, pansexual, asexual, etc.  Gender is not tied to sexual preference, & there are a million ways to express desire.•    Don’t fetishize.  Transpeople’s bodies are not a public forum. “Creatures with cunts,” “the best of both worlds” & “chicks with dicks” are all inappropriate ways of describing transpeople’s bodies.•    Don’t ask transpeople about their bodies, how they have sex, what their genitals are like, etc.  It’s rude & none of your business.  It can help to think about whether you would ask these questions of a non-trans person.•    Don’t ask about surgery or hormone status; don’t ask “when are you going to have the surgery?” or “are you on hormones?” Like non-trans people, our medical histories & bodies can be intensely personal & private.  If transpeople want to share these details with you, allow them to do so on their own terms.•    Don’t assume the only way to transition is through hormones/surgery, & understand that medical transition is very often based on economic status.  Recognize the classism inherent in associating medical transition with “authentic” trans identities.•    Don’t assume all transpeople want hormones and/or surgery, or to transition at all.•    Don’t assume all transpeople feel “trapped in the wrong body.” This is an oversimplification and not the way (all) transpeople feel.•    Don’t assume all transpeople identify as “men” or “women.”  Many transpeople and genderqueer people identify as both, neither, or something altogether different.•    Don’t tell transpeople what is appropriate to their gender (e.g., transwomen should grow their hair out & wear dresses).  Like non-trans people, we have varying forms of gender expression.•    Recognize the diversity of trans & genderqueer lives. Remember that these identities are part of other identities, and intersect with race, class, sexual preference, age, etc.•    Do listen if a transperson chooses to talk to you about their gender identity.  Be honest about things you don’t understand—don’t try to fake it!•    Be aware of places transpeople may not be able to go (pun intended). Be understanding if a transperson doesn’t feel safe using a gendered bathroom or locker room. If your organization is holding an event, designate a gender-neutral bathroom in the building.•    Recognize that not all transpeople or genderqueer folks are out there trying to smash the gender binary. Recognize that it’s not their responsibility. If you want to smash the gender binary, then you do it!•    Don’t ask transpeople to educate you.  Do your own homework & research.  Understand that there is a difference between talking to individuals about their preferences/perspectives and forcing someone to be your educator.  Try not to view individuals as spokespeople; the trans communities are diverse, not one monolithic voice or viewpoint.•    Don’t assume transmen are exempt from male privilege, misogyny, sexism, etc, just because of a so-called “girl past.”•    Recognize that transwomen deal with sexism in a very real way (on top of transphobia).•    Recognize that transwomen deserve access to “women-only” spaces/programs/shelters/etc.•    Recognize your privilege & prejudices as a normatively gendered person.•    Think about what makes you uncomfortable & why.•    Don’t let transphobia slide.  Confront it as you would confront all other forms of oppression. Trans issues are rarely discussed & when they are it is often in a negative light. Transphobia is equally oppressive as (& works in conjunction with) sexism, homophobia, racism, classism, etc.•    Talk about trans issues/rights.  Engage people in discussions & share your knowledge. The majority of “information” people have about trans issues is based on stereotypes & assumptions.  To most people, trans folks are the freaks from Jerry Springer.•    Be aware of the vital role you play as a non-trans person. Remember that the way you talk about transpeople (e.g., using the right pronouns) influences how others perceive us & can make a difference in whether we pass, & whether we feel safe/comfortable. Always remember that people may be more likely to listen to & take cues from non-trans people than from transpeople.  What you say & do matters!•    Don’t just mourn or take action when transpeople are murdered.  Celebrate trans lives & work at making trans & genderqueer issues more visible on a day-to-day basis.•    Don’t tokenize.  Simply adding the “T” to LGB doesn’t make you or your organization hip, progressive, or an ally.  Make sure you have the resources, information & understanding to deserve that T.•    Above all respect and support transpeople in their lives & choices.

LGBTQ* Ally Tips

Graphic from Trinity’s Q Soc (of Ireland)

Following text from UC Davis’ Trans* Ally Tips Page

Trans Ally Tips

SOME WAYS TO BE A GOOD TRANS ALLY…

•    Don’t ever out a transperson. This is dangerous to their safety & can invalidate their identity.  Likewise, be aware of your surroundings when discussing trans issues with a transperson. For their safety & comfort, they may prefer not to discuss these topics in public places or among strangers.

•    Always use the pronouns & name the person wants you to use. If you’re unsure, ASK!  If you make a mistake, correct yourself, & politely (& subtly, if possible) correct others if they use the wrong pronoun.

•    Ask when & where it’s safe to use their chosen name & pronouns (e.g., if a transperson is not out at home, ask them how you should refer to them around their family, etc). Don’t ask transpeople what their “real” name is (i.e., the one they were born with).  If you know their birth name, do not divulge it to others.  

•    Instead of using prefixes like bio- or real- to designate that someone is not trans, use “non-trans” or the prefix “cis-”. Two reasons for this: one, using “real” or “bio” sets up a dichotomy in which transpeople are not considered “real” or “biological.”  Two, using the terms trans & non-trans or cis- alters the framework so that transpeople are the default rather than the Other.  Setting up trans as the norm can help make transphobia & gender privilege more obvious.

•    Instead of saying someone was born a boy (or a girl), try saying they were assigned male at birth (or were female-assigned).  These terms recognize the difference between sex & gender, and emphasize the ways in which sex & gender are assigned to individuals at birth, rather than being innate, binary or immutable qualities.

•    Don’t confuse gender with sexual preference.  Transpeople, like non-trans people, are straight, gay, bisexual, pansexual, asexual, etc.  Gender is not tied to sexual preference, & there are a million ways to express desire.

•    Don’t fetishize.  Transpeople’s bodies are not a public forum. “Creatures with cunts,” “the best of both worlds” & “chicks with dicks” are all inappropriate ways of describing transpeople’s bodies.

•    Don’t ask transpeople about their bodies, how they have sex, what their genitals are like, etc.  It’s rude & none of your business.  It can help to think about whether you would ask these questions of a non-trans person.

•    Don’t ask about surgery or hormone status; don’t ask “when are you going to have the surgery?” or “are you on hormones?” Like non-trans people, our medical histories & bodies can be intensely personal & private.  If transpeople want to share these details with you, allow them to do so on their own terms.

•    Don’t assume the only way to transition is through hormones/surgery, & understand that medical transition is very often based on economic status.  Recognize the classism inherent in associating medical transition with “authentic” trans identities.

•    Don’t assume all transpeople want hormones and/or surgery, or to transition at all.

•    Don’t assume all transpeople feel “trapped in the wrong body.” This is an oversimplification and not the way (all) transpeople feel.

•    Don’t assume all transpeople identify as “men” or “women.”  Many transpeople and genderqueer people identify as both, neither, or something altogether different.

•    Don’t tell transpeople what is appropriate to their gender (e.g., transwomen should grow their hair out & wear dresses).  Like non-trans people, we have varying forms of gender expression.

•    Recognize the diversity of trans & genderqueer lives. Remember that these identities are part of other identities, and intersect with race, class, sexual preference, age, etc.

•    Do listen if a transperson chooses to talk to you about their gender identity.  Be honest about things you don’t understand—don’t try to fake it!

•    Be aware of places transpeople may not be able to go (pun intended). Be understanding if a transperson doesn’t feel safe using a gendered bathroom or locker room. If your organization is holding an event, designate a gender-neutral bathroom in the building.

•    Recognize that not all transpeople or genderqueer folks are out there trying to smash the gender binary. Recognize that it’s not their responsibility. If you want to smash the gender binary, then you do it!

•    Don’t ask transpeople to educate you.  Do your own homework & research.  Understand that there is a difference between talking to individuals about their preferences/perspectives and forcing someone to be your educator.  Try not to view individuals as spokespeople; the trans communities are diverse, not one monolithic voice or viewpoint.

•    Don’t assume transmen are exempt from male privilege, misogyny, sexism, etc, just because of a so-called “girl past.”

•    Recognize that transwomen deal with sexism in a very real way (on top of transphobia).

•    Recognize that transwomen deserve access to “women-only” spaces/programs/shelters/etc.

•    Recognize your privilege & prejudices as a normatively gendered person.

•    Think about what makes you uncomfortable & why.

•    Don’t let transphobia slide.  Confront it as you would confront all other forms of oppression. Trans issues are rarely discussed & when they are it is often in a negative light. Transphobia is equally oppressive as (& works in conjunction with) sexism, homophobia, racism, classism, etc.

•    Talk about trans issues/rights.  Engage people in discussions & share your knowledge. The majority of “information” people have about trans issues is based on stereotypes & assumptions.  To most people, trans folks are the freaks from Jerry Springer.

•    Be aware of the vital role you play as a non-trans person. Remember that the way you talk about transpeople (e.g., using the right pronouns) influences how others perceive us & can make a difference in whether we pass, & whether we feel safe/comfortable. Always remember that people may be more likely to listen to & take cues from non-trans people than from transpeople.  What you say & do matters!

•    Don’t just mourn or take action when transpeople are murdered.  Celebrate trans lives & work at making trans & genderqueer issues more visible on a day-to-day basis.

•    Don’t tokenize.  Simply adding the “T” to LGB doesn’t make you or your organization hip, progressive, or an ally.  Make sure you have the resources, information & understanding to deserve that T.

•    Above all respect and support transpeople in their lives & choices.

Flags Representing Gender Identification


  1. GenderQueer Flag (GenderQueer Flag History)
  2. Intersex Flag (this flag should count for both birth sex and identifying gender - it is important to never assume someone’s birth sex or gender identity) 
  3. Transgender Flag (History of Trans* Flag)

We’re Here! We’re (LGBTQ*/Allies)!

KNOWhomo Question of the Week:

We are here. Everywhere. You are not alone. Next time you feel like you are the only LGBTQ*/ally in your state or country, remember there are millions of us.

I’m in Virginia. I moved here from Louisiana. California born. (Also lived in Germany and South Carolina growing up.)

Where are you from? (for safety, please don’t list your city/town)

Which state or country?