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LGBTQ* Deviant Artist You Should Know

Benjamin Ruth of Rebel Comix

creator of The Traveling Twinks! and (one panel of) Leaping Lesbians! - Your Illustrated Gay/Lesbian Homo Historians

Jun 9
Did You KNOW?

You can access many of the popular #tags from KNOWhomo on our page? Anytime? 
When you’re on KNOWhomo.tumblr.com, just scroll down on the right side for over three dozen frequent tags.
And as always —-
Keep On, Keeping On!

Did You KNOW?

You can access many of the popular #tags from KNOWhomo on our page? Anytime? 

When you’re on KNOWhomo.tumblr.com, just scroll down on the right side for over three dozen frequent tags.

And as always —-

Keep On, Keeping On!

Jun 1
KNOW  Love.
KNOW  History.
KNOW Pride!
KNOWhomo.

KNOW  Love.

KNOW  History.

KNOW Pride!

KNOWhomo.

LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips

#Quotes and Quips  

What’s the best “(lgbtq)” advice you have ever been given?

KNOWhomo’s April Opinion/ Insight Question:

What’s the best “(lgbtq)” advice you have ever been given?

Reblogged by Request for Summer Reading Lists

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Posts We Love (and Blogs We Love to Follow)

Queer Book Club's Hogwart's House Reading List


ALL of the following text is from the posts of QueerBookClub.tumblr.com:

[image description: a red banner reading “queer books for gryffindor” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]

This is the first of four recommended reading lists of queer and queer-ish books, organized by Hogwarts houses! ENJOY.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
This story of a young woman captured by Nazis during a spy mission in occupied France has repeatedly been called a tour de force and the best novel of last year. Though not explicitly queer, the heart of the story is the deep, loving friendship of two girls.

Diverse Energies edited by Tobias Buckell and Joe Monti.
This collection of dystopian stories starring heroes of color is perfect for the daring, strong-willed wizards of Gryffindor. A handful of the stories also feature queer protagonists or minor characters.

Batwoman: Elegy by Greg Rucka and J.H. Williams III.
What’s more exemplary of good-hearted headstrong Gryffindor spirit than taking up the cape and fighting evil? Besides starring a lesbian superhero, this volume also features an introduction by Rachel Maddow - we will just have to ignore the fact that she’s basically the nation’s Ravenclaw prefect.

When She Woke by Hillary Jordon
This re-imagining of The Scarlet Letter tells the story of Hannah, a woman who finds herself marked as a murderer after an abortion. In this future world, criminals’ skin is colored to indicate the class of their crime. Hannah’s red skin means a life of shame and cruelty - unless she can forge a new path.

Huntress by Malinda Lo
Epic quests. Hostile monsters. The fate of the world. If that’s your kind of story, look no further. Tough, down-to-earth Kaede and gentle, visionary Taisin set out to find out what caused their land to fall into endless cold.

She’s Not There: A Life in Two Genders by Jennifer Finney Boylan
Let’s not get into tropes about transgender people being so brave. I chose this book for this list because Boylan reminds me of Gryffindor in other ways - considerate but honest, amiable but not self-sacrificing, and, you know, popular. Bestselling, even!

[image description: a green banner reading “queer books for slytherin” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]


A Girl’s Guide to Taking Over the World: Writings from the Girl Zine Revolution edited by Karen Green and Tristan Taromino
While this collection of writings from zines of the early 90s riot grrl era and beyond may not be an actual blueprint for world domination, it is just as brash, smart and unapologetic as any Slytherin.

Teeth by Hannah Moskowitz
This story of an isolated teenager’s relationship with a monstrous fish-boy is supposed to be seriously grim. The darkness factor - and the fact that Pottermore tells us that the Slytherin common room windows gives students a view of the creatures the lake - is what makes it a great Slytherin pick.

The Complete Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist by Diane DiMassa
Before some tumblr misandrists were even born, Hothead Paisan was collecting rapists’ spines. Queer Slytherins in need of some guilt-free revenge fantasy should pick this one up - though I implore you to read up on the author’s transmisogyny first.

Sula by Toni Morrison
While not explicitly queer, this story is held together by love between women. Slytherins will likely relate to Sula, a community pariah whose motivations are as incomprehensible to her friends and family as theirs are to her.

Sister Mischief by Laura Goode
Esme Rockett is probably a Gryffindor at heart (they tend to get the leading roles). But she and her friends - outsiders in their lily-white Christian community - employ all their cunning to wreck havoc for the establishment. Sex, drugs and hip-hop make this YA debut a conservative censor’s worst nightmare - or wet dream, maybe.

When You Are Engulfed In Flames by David Sedaris
This contemporary master of the personal essay always manages to come off as judgmental, selfish, petty, loveable and brilliant. Tapping into our dark spots to charm us, Sedaris is an exemplary Slytherin - and skull-centric cover art doesn’t hurt, either.

[image description: a blue banner reading “queer books for ravenclaw” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]


Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity edited by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
This collection of short works on identity, community and authenticity covers a lot of territory - “passing” as related to gender, race, disability, work, nationality, sexuality, and more. Pick it up if you’re itching for more complex perspectives on social justice.

Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
Besides being an absolute masterpiece of the comics format, Bechdel’s memoir about her cold and inscrutable father earns major Ravenclaw appeal with its highbrow literary allusions. If psychology is more your thing, try her other memoir, Are You My Mother?

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
This book tells the story of two Mexican-American teens - Ari, an angry loner, and Dante, a quirky intellectual - who form a transformative bond and ponder over poetry, philosophy and life’s many mysteries. I haven’t gotten my hands on this one yet, but I’ve been told it’s one of those rare transcendent young adult books, emotionally resonant and masterfully crafted.

Israel/Palestine and the Queer International by Sarah Schulman
This latest work from the prolific author and longtime activist chronicles her travels through Tel Aviv and the West Bank and her growing consciousness of the occupation of Palestine. Read it for a knowledgeable queer perspective on a divisive topic.

Adaptation by Malinda Lo
There’s not much on this list for science aficionados, but hopefully some science fiction will suit you. Did you know Malinda Lo did graduate work on The X-Files? This novel, the first in a forthcoming series, has flavors of the 90s TV show and should delight fans of Mulder and Scully, creepy conspiracies, and queer representation in sci-fi lit.

Transgender History by Susan Stryker
For the history buffs - this concise text on transgender people in America between the mid twentieth century and early twenty-first puts trans communities and movements in historical context and offers a compact but comprehensive chronicle of our stories.

[image description: a yellow banner reading “queer books for hufflepuff” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]

A Queer and Pleasant Danger: The True Story of a Nice Jewish Boy Who Joins the Church of Scientology and Leaves Twelve Years Later to Become the Lovely Lady She is Today by Kate Bornstein
This newest memoir is actually one of the few of Auntie Kate’s books that I haven’t read, but I couldn’t resist the Hufflepuff-yellow cover. Open, honest and compassionate, Bornstein’s books always feel like a big hug and kiss to outcasts everywhere. 

Will Grayson Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan
Green might be the most famous living Puff since he proclaimed it on The Late Late Show. I’m not sure what Levithan’s sorting is, but this book - about two boys with one name, how people come together and how they drift apart - is definitely a good one for us sensitive badgers.

Ask the Passengers by A.S. King
I was tempted at first to prescribe this YA book to Ravenclaws, as its heroine, Astrid, is a philosophy nerd who regularly meets with her invisible friend Socrates. She does, however, nickname him Frank and compare him to a cute dog. Moreover, her questions are more of the heart than the head: How can I be seen for who I am? Why isn’t equality easy? Where can my love be safe?

10,000 Dresses by Marcus Ewert and Rex Ray
Need a bright dose of hope? Pick up this beautiful children’s book about a young trans girl who finds someone who believes in her dreams and appreciates her for just who she is.

Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life by Marshall B. Rosenberg
A great resource for shy or insecure Hufflepuffs who have trouble communicating, or badger activists who want to get their words across without invalidating anyone’s feelings and experiences. If you get too overwhelmed by conversation, I also recommend The Highly Sensitive Person.

Weetzie Bat by Francesca Lia Block
While I strongly prefer the Dangerous Angel books that focus on Witch BabyWeetzie’s sunny but sensitive disposition is probably more Hufflepuff appropriate. Her naïveté fits perfectly with mainstream perceptions of Puffs, while her big deep loud love for her chosen family is reminiscent of Hufflepuff as I know it.

Apr 6

Call Out for All SPRING Research / LGBTQ* Research Requests

Working on a paper?

Interested in how many incarnations of the Gay/Lesbian Flag there were before our standard six color rainbow?

Unsure when “homosexual” became a term? Or that it predates the term “heterosexual” by a few years?

Want to know more about Queen Christina? 

Is it true that -…?

KNOWhomo is taking their quarterly roundups / asks for this season’s posts. If you’d like to know more about a topic, leave it below. You can also ask anonymous HERE.

Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca

?

Apr 2

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* History You May Have Missed:

How California Got Its Name

"The Spaniards had observed primarily male behavior. Typical of European men of the era, female same-sex relations, and even gender inversion, was the stuff of fantasy for them. They were enamored of Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo’s protolesbian-tale about a mythical island called ‘California’ where Queen Califia lived with her beloved subjects, all of whom were masculine women. ‘And there were no males among them at all,’ Montalvo wrote. He described the women as having “energetic bodies and courageous ardent hearts.’ Like the Amazons of Greek myth, they waged bloody war on other lands, killing most of the males but carrying away a few so that they might copulate with them for the sake of procreation. Female babies were kept among them; male babies were slaughtered. In 1535, Hernan Cortes, sharing his era’s enchantment with the story of these fierce, manless women, wrote the name ‘California’ on a map of a strip of land on the west coast of North America. It has remained the name ever since—though the protolesbian source is long forgotten.”

From Gay L.A.: A History of Sexual Outlaws, Power Politics, and Lipstick Lesbiansedited by Lillian Faderman and Stuart Timmons.

(The first photo is the first map to print the toponym [place name] “California.” 1562, Diego Gutierrez.)

(The second photo is of Las Sergas de Esplandian [The Adventures of Esplandian], the romance novel by Garci Rodrigues de Montalvo that mentions the legend of California. 1510.)

KNOWhomo’s First Book Club

We are taking votes from now until March 30th for our first KNOWhomo Online/Multi-Chat Book Group (as well as a punny/spiffy name).

The selection has been narrowed down to the books below.

Please include your insight. The book with the most responses will kick us off.

All blurbs below are copied from GoodReads.com

Love in the Time of Global Warming (Love in the Time of Global Warming #1)

Seventeen-year-old Penelope (Pen) has lost everything—her home, her parents, and her ten-year-old brother. Like a female Odysseus in search of home, she navigates a dark world full of strange creatures, gathers companions and loses them, finds love and loses it, and faces her mortal enemy.

Fun Home

A fresh and brilliantly told memoir from a cult favorite comic artist, marked by gothic twists, a family funeral home, sexual angst, and great books.
This breakout book by Alison Bechdel is a darkly funny family tale, pitch-perfectly illustrated with Bechdel’s sweetly gothic drawings. Like Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, it’s a story exhilaratingly suited to graphic memoir form.
Meet Alison’s father, a historic preservation expert and obsessive restorer of the family’s Victorian home, a third-generation funeral home director, a high school English teacher, an icily distant parent, and a closeted homosexual who, as it turns out, is involved with his male students and a family babysitter. Through narrative that is alternately heartbreaking and fiercely funny, we are drawn into a daughter’s complex yearning for her father. And yet, apart from assigned stints dusting caskets at the family-owned “fun home,” as Alison and her brothers call it, the relationship achieves its most intimate expression through the shared code of books.
When Alison comes out as homosexual herself in late adolescence, the denouement is swift, graphic — and redemptive

Stuck Rubber Baby

by Howard CruseTony Kushner (Introduction)
A truly eye-opening comic. The story is set in the South in the early ’60s and deals with homophobia, racism and the gay subculture of that period. The art is absolutely beautiful; Cruse is a master of the cross-hatching technique, which gives a certain “texture” to his art work and brings his pages to life. Stuck Rubber Baby is easily the most important comic book since Art Spiegelman’s Maus

Hero

The last thing in the world Thom Creed wants is to add to his father’s pain, so he keeps secrets. Like that he has special powers. And that he’s been asked to join the League - the very organization of superheroes that spurned his dad. But the most painful secret of all is one Thom can barely face himself: he’s gay.

But becoming a member of the League opens up a new world to Thom. There, he connects with a misfit group of aspiring heroes, including Scarlett, who can control fire but not her anger; Typhoid Larry, who can make anyone sick with his touch; and Ruth, a wise old broad who can see the future. Like Thom, these heroes have things to hide; but they will have to learn to trust one another when they uncover a deadly conspiracy within the League.

To survive, Thom will face challenges he never imagined. To find happiness, he’ll have to come to terms with his father’s past and discover the kind of hero he really wants to be

I Am J

J always felt different. He was certain that eventually everyone would understand who he really was; a boy mistakenly born as a girl. Yet as he grew up, his body began to betray him; eventually J stopped praying to wake up a “real boy” and started covering up his body, keeping himself invisible - from his family, from his friends…from the world. But after being deserted by the best friend he thought would always be by his side, J decides that he’s done hiding - it’s time to be who he really is. And this time he is determined not to give up, no matter the cost.

An inspiring story of self-discovery, of choosing to stand up for yourself, and of finding your own path - readers will recognize a part of themselves in J’s struggle to love his true self.

?

Without forgiveness life is governed by… an endless cycle of resentment and retaliation. ~Roberto Assagioli

-

Personal Statement:

I have a lot of feelings and thoughts about Fred Phelps death. Many of which I know are healthy and considered understandable (being a queer* wom(a/y)n). I also know that the only way to beat an oppressor is to rise above their actions.  —- And I’m going to try. 

I lieu of flowers (or hate mail), I will continue to vote. I will continue to volunteer at LGBTQ* Outreach and student events. I will continue to research. I will continue to share. I will continue to love. I will continue to be a strong person who understands my privilege and actively works towards recognizing others who are given less (and do my best to change my daily actions to break such vicious cycles). I will continue to fight with my intelligence and voice. 

And I will flourish. 

Good bye and goodnight, Fred Phelps.

-Rebecca, creator and co-moderator of KNOWhomo.tumblr

LGBTQ* Gallop Polls (You May Have Missed)
2012’s Gallup Poll: 
"Do you, personally, identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender?"
3.4% of those you participated said “Yes”
On the Poll’s Wording:
Being ignored and not finding your representation is not empowering and can lead to many voices not being recorded. No one should be erased. Sadly, many people believe LGBT(Q*) is the most inclusive way to ask everyone who does not identify as cis- and heterosexual. We need a more inclusive way to ask these questions and properly document and record our neighbors. Do you have any recommendations on better wording? 

Note: I, Rebecca, am knee deep in statistics for an upcoming KNOWhomo (Kh) project. If you have participated in any Campus, University , School, or Community Polls, similar to this, feel free to send me information. And as always:  Keep On, Keeping On!

?

LGBTQ* Gallop Polls (You May Have Missed)

2012’s Gallup Poll: 

"Do you, personally, identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender?"

3.4% of those you participated said “Yes”

On the Poll’s Wording:

Being ignored and not finding your representation is not empowering and can lead to many voices not being recorded. No one should be erased. Sadly, many people believe LGBT(Q*) is the most inclusive way to ask everyone who does not identify as cis- and heterosexual. We need a more inclusive way to ask these questions and properly document and record our neighbors. Do you have any recommendations on better wording? 

Note: I, Rebecca, am knee deep in statistics for an upcoming KNOWhomo (Kh) project. If you have participated in any Campus, University , School, or Community Polls, similar to this, feel free to send me information. And as always:  Keep On, Keeping On!

?

Online Book Group

Question for Friends and Family:

Would you be interested in doing a Book Group / live feed and chat each month? We can host 1-3 different times where you can log in and participate via webcam or in a chat room about a selected book each month.

Anyone game?

The Heart Of The Matter

knowhomo:

What is straight?  A line can be straight, or a street, but the human heart, oh, no, it’s curved like a road through mountains.  ~Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1947

Flashback post: KNOWhomo.tumblr’s first post, Jan 2011.

In order to know where we are going, we must remember where we started. KNOWhomo turns THREE this week.

We’re just getting started.

Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca, creator and co-moderator, KNOWhomo

Jan 1

What’s In Your LGBTQ* Power Playlist?

What’s your power anthem?

What LGBTQ* song can you not get enough of?

What makes you feel proud?

What makes you feel powerful and loved?

What song do you turn to 11 when wanting a pick-me-up?

Leave your answer below or send it to us anonymously. We will using them in a project for later this month.

Keep On, Keeping On!

The KNOWhomo Team

Happy Holidays, from us to you.

We hope you are enjoying time with your families and chosen families, wherever you may be. We hope y’all are celebrating whatever you like, however you like.

We’re excited to spend our first Christmas post-moving-in-together mostly in one piece, with only minor disagreements about what color lights go on the tree. (Rebecca won. Traditional German white lights. Good thing Ruth Elizabeth figured out what to do with the multi-colored strands!)

Keep On, Keeping On!

<3  Rebecca and Ruth Elizabeth

(all photos belong to the KNOWhomo team.)