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LGBTQ* Contemporary History (as of May 18th, 2014)

Ten years ago this week, Massachusetts becomes first state to legalize and recognize same-sex (similar gender identity and/or assigned gender) marriage.

Photo Source: All copied from Vox.com. Individual pictures sourced through Freedom to Marry and Lambda Legal.

Photographs, Photographers, and Coffee Table Books

You Might Have Missed -

CAPTURING LOVE

By Thea Dodds and Kathryn Hamm  
Authentic Weddings, $32.95

Sources/Websites featuring articles/photography:

  1. Book Jacket
  2. New Hampshire P.R.  ©Thea Dodd Photography
  3. Professional Photographer Left ©Andrea Flanagan Photography; Right ©Tammy Watson Photography
  4. Professional Photographer  ©Kristin Chalmers Photography
  5. BuzzFeed  ©Hudson River Photography
  6. BuzzFeed  ©Allana Tarranto of Ars Magna Studios
  7. Freedom to Marry ©Dawn E. Roscoe Photography
  8. Freedom to Marry ©Cean One Photography
  9. Freedom to Marry ©Maggie Winters Photography

Alan L. Hart
SYMIHC

Podcasts You May Have Missed:

Alan L. Hart  from Stuff You Missed In History Class

Following from Missed In History:

Alan L. Hart was a novelist and a doctor who did groundbreaking work in the world of public health and tuberculosis detection. He was also one of the first people in the United States to undergo surgery as part of transitioning to a different gender than the one to which he had been born. His gender and sexual orientation influenced both his writing and his career. After his transition, he faced extensive discrimination and harassment: For much of his life, he had to move from place to place after colleagues discovered that he had been born female.

Previous KNOWhomo post about Dr. J. Allen Gilbert can be read HERE

NOTE: Some of the language may cause triggers. I  highly recommend listening to Tracy and Holly speak at the end of the podcast. Missed in History works diligently on their research. Language is incredibly complicated and it is quite clear in their discussion that their intention is to be P.C. and inclusive. This may be a bit problematic to some listeners at times, due to language/phrasing used. Please remember we are all learning together and the Stuff You Missed team is very receptive to insightful, polite responses.

LGBTQ* Military/Service History
"Undesirable" == "Homosexual"
During WWII the United States Military starting issuing “Blue Discharges.”
A Blue Discharge/Blue Slip was named because of the color paper it was printed on. These slips were used exclusively for dishonorably discharging soldiers accused of being homosexual. Once discharged, a serviceman could NOT receive any government benefits for his service in the armed forces and could be REFUSED employment by anyone.
Side Fact:
The government hired psychologists to find “the homosexual” recruits. When soldiers signed up for the service, they would be asked a series of questions with (code) words that were thought to highlight homosexual behavior. It is projected that for every one LGBTQ* individual who was detained, ten passed. By the third year of World War II, the United States Government told psychologists to stop screening. Every physical body was needed for deployment.

LGBTQ* Military/Service History

"Undesirable" == "Homosexual"

During WWII the United States Military starting issuing “Blue Discharges.”

A Blue Discharge/Blue Slip was named because of the color paper it was printed on. These slips were used exclusively for dishonorably discharging soldiers accused of being homosexual. Once discharged, a serviceman could NOT receive any government benefits for his service in the armed forces and could be REFUSED employment by anyone.

Side Fact:

The government hired psychologists to find “the homosexual” recruits. When soldiers signed up for the service, they would be asked a series of questions with (code) words that were thought to highlight homosexual behavior. It is projected that for every one LGBTQ* individual who was detained, ten passed. By the third year of World War II, the United States Government told psychologists to stop screening. Every physical body was needed for deployment.

Is anyone going to be in the District of Columbia for the June 7th Pride Parade?

At this time, it looks like the entire KNOWhomo staff will be in D.C. for Capital Pride on June 7th. Will anyone be in town to celebrate? Should we gather and watch the parade together?

Old-Fashioned Lesbian Love Story
The Wild Party

Queer Anthems - Broadway/Off-Broadway Style

"Old-Fashioned Lesbian Love Story"  Andrew Lippa’s The Wild Party

I need a good-natured, old-fashioned 
Lesbian love story
The kind of tale my mama used to tell.
Where the girls were so sweet
And the music would swell
And in the end the queen would send the men off to hell.

What is that mild-mannered, old-fashioned 
Lesbian love story
Where people knew exactly who they were?
I want the story of yore
That they don’t sing anymore
To an old-fashioned dyke like her.

Full Lyrics Here

LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar
Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artists and Sexual Renegade
—By Justin Springs
(From Publisher’s Weekly)
Life in the closet proves boisterous indeed in this biography of an iconic figure of the pre-Stonewall gay demimonde. Steward (1909–1993) was an English professor, a novelist who wrote both well-received literary fiction and gay porn, a confidant of Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder, a furtive but exuberant erotic adventurer whose taste for sailors, rough trade, and violent sadomasochism endeared him to sex researcher Alfred Kinsey; later in life, he became Phil Sparrow, official tattoo artist of the Oakland, Calif., Hell’s Angels. Spring (Paul Cadmus) fleshes out this colorful story by quoting copiously from his subject’s highly literate journals and sex diaries—his Stud File contained entries on trysts with everyone from Rudolph Valentino to Rock Hudson—which afford an unabashed account of Steward’s erotic picaresque and the yearnings that drove it. (His swerve from academia into tattooing, with its mix of physical pain and proximity to nubile male flesh, was essentially a fetish turned into a business.) Spring’s sympathetic and entertaining story of a life registers the limitations imposed on homosexuals by a repressive society, but also celebrates the creativity and daring with which Steward tested them..Copyright © Reed Business Information

LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar

Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artists and Sexual Renegade

—By Justin Springs

(From Publisher’s Weekly)

Life in the closet proves boisterous indeed in this biography of an iconic figure of the pre-Stonewall gay demimonde. Steward (1909–1993) was an English professor, a novelist who wrote both well-received literary fiction and gay porn, a confidant of Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder, a furtive but exuberant erotic adventurer whose taste for sailors, rough trade, and violent sadomasochism endeared him to sex researcher Alfred Kinsey; later in life, he became Phil Sparrow, official tattoo artist of the Oakland, Calif., Hell’s Angels. Spring (Paul Cadmus) fleshes out this colorful story by quoting copiously from his subject’s highly literate journals and sex diaries—his Stud File contained entries on trysts with everyone from Rudolph Valentino to Rock Hudson—which afford an unabashed account of Steward’s erotic picaresque and the yearnings that drove it. (His swerve from academia into tattooing, with its mix of physical pain and proximity to nubile male flesh, was essentially a fetish turned into a business.) Spring’s sympathetic and entertaining story of a life registers the limitations imposed on homosexuals by a repressive society, but also celebrates the creativity and daring with which Steward tested them..
Copyright © Reed Business Information

CONGRATULATIONS MICHAEL SAM & THE ST. LOUIS RAMS

May 9

LGBTQ* Anthems

A Great Big World - “Everyone Is Gay

If you’re gay then you’re gay
Don’t pretend that you’re straight
You can be who you are any day of the week
You are unlike the others
So strong and unique
We’re all with you

If you’re straight well that’s great
You can help procreate
And make gay little babies
For the whole human race
Make a world we can live in
Where the one who you love’s not an issue

'Cause we're all somewhere in the middle
And we’re all just looking for love to change the world
What if the world stops spinning tomorrow?
We can’t keep running away from who we are

If you’re gay then you’re gay
If you’re straight well that’s great
If you fall in between that’s the best way to be
You’ve got so many options
Every fish in the sea wants to kiss you

Awwww…

'Cause we're all somewhere in the middle
And we’re all just looking for love to change the world
What if the world stops spinning tomorrow?
We can’t keep running away from who we are

And we’re all here in it together
We’re one step closer to breaking down the walls
Everyone is gay

Take a two-minute GayWrites survey and get a free sticker!

KNOWhomo is a huge fan and supporter of Camille’s fantastic work. She’s looking for survey participants. If you have the time, please consider completing GayWrites.org’s survey. 

gaywrites:

Hi, friends! 

I’m pondering some changes to improve GayWrites in the coming months, but before that, I’d really love your input on what you like and dislike about it. Would you please take two minutes (seriously, it’s so short) and answer a couple of questions about what matters most to you?

In exchange, if you like, I’ll send you a free GayWrites sticker to put on your laptop, your favorite notebook, or your face. (I do not recommend putting it on your face.) Picture of said sticker above, or here. You must be comfortable giving me your address.

Thank you thank you thank you for the love and support, and bear with me when I reblog this a couple of times. To take the survey, click the link in the post title or click here. You all rock. 

In case you missed it! I wanna know more about why you read this blog (or why you quickly scroll past it whenever it comes up on your dash). Give me some feedback and I’ll send you a super cool sticker. While supplies last! Which may not be very long. 

Research Websites You (Should) Know

Online Etymology Dictionary

What’s the best “(lgbtq)” advice you have ever been given?

KNOWhomo’s April Opinion/ Insight Question:

What’s the best “(lgbtq)” advice you have ever been given?

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
(and then what happened)
Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.
To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.
Would you like to know more? Check out:
#History You Should Know 
#Black/African American 
#Pink Triangle History 
#Flag(s) History 
#Military/Armed Forces 
#Vintage 
#Christian 
#Jewish 
#Muslim 
 

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

(and then what happened)

Following the liberation of concentration camps, many gay survivors (the pink triangles) were placed in prison by German authorities. Since concentration camps were not considered “jail,” homosexual men were still in violation of Paragraph 175 (a law outlawing homosexuality in Germany) and were then placed in prison to serve time for breaking the law.

To this day, not one single gay survivor or family member has been given financial payments by the government in Germany. 

KNOWhomo history reblogs.

Would you like to know more? Check out:

#History You Should Know 

#Black/African American 

#Pink Triangle History 

#Flag(s) History 

#Military/Armed Forces 

#Vintage 

#Christian 

#Jewish 

#Muslim 

 

LGBTQ* Comic Artists You May Be Interested In

Erika Moen - artist/writer

Some of Erika’s illustrations/dialogue is NSFW. Please be advised. Also, some of Tumblr has been really harsh about Erika’s marriage to a cisman and her views of queer politics. If you would like to hear some responses to Erika’s work within the comic industry and her feelings about sexuality as it evolves, I highly recommend watching her visit to Yale video below.


Some of Erika’s Work:

D.A.R. Comics/Archive (D.A.R. at the beginning

GirlF**k

Erika Speaks at Yale

Bucko Comic

Reblogged by Request for Summer Reading Lists

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Posts We Love (and Blogs We Love to Follow)

Queer Book Club's Hogwart's House Reading List


ALL of the following text is from the posts of QueerBookClub.tumblr.com:

[image description: a red banner reading “queer books for gryffindor” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]

This is the first of four recommended reading lists of queer and queer-ish books, organized by Hogwarts houses! ENJOY.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
This story of a young woman captured by Nazis during a spy mission in occupied France has repeatedly been called a tour de force and the best novel of last year. Though not explicitly queer, the heart of the story is the deep, loving friendship of two girls.

Diverse Energies edited by Tobias Buckell and Joe Monti.
This collection of dystopian stories starring heroes of color is perfect for the daring, strong-willed wizards of Gryffindor. A handful of the stories also feature queer protagonists or minor characters.

Batwoman: Elegy by Greg Rucka and J.H. Williams III.
What’s more exemplary of good-hearted headstrong Gryffindor spirit than taking up the cape and fighting evil? Besides starring a lesbian superhero, this volume also features an introduction by Rachel Maddow - we will just have to ignore the fact that she’s basically the nation’s Ravenclaw prefect.

When She Woke by Hillary Jordon
This re-imagining of The Scarlet Letter tells the story of Hannah, a woman who finds herself marked as a murderer after an abortion. In this future world, criminals’ skin is colored to indicate the class of their crime. Hannah’s red skin means a life of shame and cruelty - unless she can forge a new path.

Huntress by Malinda Lo
Epic quests. Hostile monsters. The fate of the world. If that’s your kind of story, look no further. Tough, down-to-earth Kaede and gentle, visionary Taisin set out to find out what caused their land to fall into endless cold.

She’s Not There: A Life in Two Genders by Jennifer Finney Boylan
Let’s not get into tropes about transgender people being so brave. I chose this book for this list because Boylan reminds me of Gryffindor in other ways - considerate but honest, amiable but not self-sacrificing, and, you know, popular. Bestselling, even!

[image description: a green banner reading “queer books for slytherin” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]


A Girl’s Guide to Taking Over the World: Writings from the Girl Zine Revolution edited by Karen Green and Tristan Taromino
While this collection of writings from zines of the early 90s riot grrl era and beyond may not be an actual blueprint for world domination, it is just as brash, smart and unapologetic as any Slytherin.

Teeth by Hannah Moskowitz
This story of an isolated teenager’s relationship with a monstrous fish-boy is supposed to be seriously grim. The darkness factor - and the fact that Pottermore tells us that the Slytherin common room windows gives students a view of the creatures the lake - is what makes it a great Slytherin pick.

The Complete Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist by Diane DiMassa
Before some tumblr misandrists were even born, Hothead Paisan was collecting rapists’ spines. Queer Slytherins in need of some guilt-free revenge fantasy should pick this one up - though I implore you to read up on the author’s transmisogyny first.

Sula by Toni Morrison
While not explicitly queer, this story is held together by love between women. Slytherins will likely relate to Sula, a community pariah whose motivations are as incomprehensible to her friends and family as theirs are to her.

Sister Mischief by Laura Goode
Esme Rockett is probably a Gryffindor at heart (they tend to get the leading roles). But she and her friends - outsiders in their lily-white Christian community - employ all their cunning to wreck havoc for the establishment. Sex, drugs and hip-hop make this YA debut a conservative censor’s worst nightmare - or wet dream, maybe.

When You Are Engulfed In Flames by David Sedaris
This contemporary master of the personal essay always manages to come off as judgmental, selfish, petty, loveable and brilliant. Tapping into our dark spots to charm us, Sedaris is an exemplary Slytherin - and skull-centric cover art doesn’t hurt, either.

[image description: a blue banner reading “queer books for ravenclaw” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]


Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity edited by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
This collection of short works on identity, community and authenticity covers a lot of territory - “passing” as related to gender, race, disability, work, nationality, sexuality, and more. Pick it up if you’re itching for more complex perspectives on social justice.

Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
Besides being an absolute masterpiece of the comics format, Bechdel’s memoir about her cold and inscrutable father earns major Ravenclaw appeal with its highbrow literary allusions. If psychology is more your thing, try her other memoir, Are You My Mother?

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
This book tells the story of two Mexican-American teens - Ari, an angry loner, and Dante, a quirky intellectual - who form a transformative bond and ponder over poetry, philosophy and life’s many mysteries. I haven’t gotten my hands on this one yet, but I’ve been told it’s one of those rare transcendent young adult books, emotionally resonant and masterfully crafted.

Israel/Palestine and the Queer International by Sarah Schulman
This latest work from the prolific author and longtime activist chronicles her travels through Tel Aviv and the West Bank and her growing consciousness of the occupation of Palestine. Read it for a knowledgeable queer perspective on a divisive topic.

Adaptation by Malinda Lo
There’s not much on this list for science aficionados, but hopefully some science fiction will suit you. Did you know Malinda Lo did graduate work on The X-Files? This novel, the first in a forthcoming series, has flavors of the 90s TV show and should delight fans of Mulder and Scully, creepy conspiracies, and queer representation in sci-fi lit.

Transgender History by Susan Stryker
For the history buffs - this concise text on transgender people in America between the mid twentieth century and early twenty-first puts trans communities and movements in historical context and offers a compact but comprehensive chronicle of our stories.

[image description: a yellow banner reading “queer books for hufflepuff” is surrounded by six book covers of the titles listed below]

A Queer and Pleasant Danger: The True Story of a Nice Jewish Boy Who Joins the Church of Scientology and Leaves Twelve Years Later to Become the Lovely Lady She is Today by Kate Bornstein
This newest memoir is actually one of the few of Auntie Kate’s books that I haven’t read, but I couldn’t resist the Hufflepuff-yellow cover. Open, honest and compassionate, Bornstein’s books always feel like a big hug and kiss to outcasts everywhere. 

Will Grayson Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan
Green might be the most famous living Puff since he proclaimed it on The Late Late Show. I’m not sure what Levithan’s sorting is, but this book - about two boys with one name, how people come together and how they drift apart - is definitely a good one for us sensitive badgers.

Ask the Passengers by A.S. King
I was tempted at first to prescribe this YA book to Ravenclaws, as its heroine, Astrid, is a philosophy nerd who regularly meets with her invisible friend Socrates. She does, however, nickname him Frank and compare him to a cute dog. Moreover, her questions are more of the heart than the head: How can I be seen for who I am? Why isn’t equality easy? Where can my love be safe?

10,000 Dresses by Marcus Ewert and Rex Ray
Need a bright dose of hope? Pick up this beautiful children’s book about a young trans girl who finds someone who believes in her dreams and appreciates her for just who she is.

Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life by Marshall B. Rosenberg
A great resource for shy or insecure Hufflepuffs who have trouble communicating, or badger activists who want to get their words across without invalidating anyone’s feelings and experiences. If you get too overwhelmed by conversation, I also recommend The Highly Sensitive Person.

Weetzie Bat by Francesca Lia Block
While I strongly prefer the Dangerous Angel books that focus on Witch BabyWeetzie’s sunny but sensitive disposition is probably more Hufflepuff appropriate. Her naïveté fits perfectly with mainstream perceptions of Puffs, while her big deep loud love for her chosen family is reminiscent of Hufflepuff as I know it.