KNOWhomo

RSS
LGBTQ* Military Stories (That Will Warm Your Heart)
I only met one other homosexual in the army. That was in Le Havre in 1917. We was on the boat coming home. I don’t know how these things work, whether it’s through conversation, or whether it’s the attitude of the individual concerned, but we seemed to come together, see. All of a sudden his arm was round my neck and this, that and the other, and then, of course, one thing led to another. And that was Phil, my affair that I had for seven years. When I come out of the army we stuck together. I was living at the time in Ilford. I rejoined the army in 1920, then I went out to Germany. I was living with Phil at the time and I saw him when I came home on leave and we kept a flat together. I was in the army because the army was my life at that period. He was somebody just like a wife to come home to…
… I don’t think our friends or family knew, yet they had a very good suspicion. Phil and I often talked about it, only he said, well, he says, as long as we love each other, what’s it to do with other people? And that was the true situation.
Text: First person account as told by Gerald, born 1892, Norfolk, England.  Excerpted from Between the Acts: Lives of Homosexual Men 1885-1967, Jeffrey Weeks and Kevin Porter (eds)
(story found thanks to: www.woolfandwilde.com)

LGBTQ* Military Stories (That Will Warm Your Heart)

I only met one other homosexual in the army. That was in Le Havre in 1917. We was on the boat coming home. I don’t know how these things work, whether it’s through conversation, or whether it’s the attitude of the individual concerned, but we seemed to come together, see. All of a sudden his arm was round my neck and this, that and the other, and then, of course, one thing led to another. And that was Phil, my affair that I had for seven years. When I come out of the army we stuck together. I was living at the time in Ilford. I rejoined the army in 1920, then I went out to Germany. I was living with Phil at the time and I saw him when I came home on leave and we kept a flat together. I was in the army because the army was my life at that period. He was somebody just like a wife to come home to…

… I don’t think our friends or family knew, yet they had a very good suspicion. Phil and I often talked about it, only he said, well, he says, as long as we love each other, what’s it to do with other people? And that was the true situation.

Text: First person account as told by Gerald, born 1892, Norfolk, England.  Excerpted from Between the Acts: Lives of Homosexual Men 1885-1967, Jeffrey Weeks and Kevin Porter (eds)

(story found thanks to: www.woolfandwilde.com)

knowhomo Reblog for R.A.’s and Teachers

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS
(read more HERE)
1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth
Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.
2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various
Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.
3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth
There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.
4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.
Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.
Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

knowhomo Reblog for R.A.’s and Teachers

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS

(read more HERE)

1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth

Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.

2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various

Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.

3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth

There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.

4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.

Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.

Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

Education is learning what you didn’t know you didn’t know. ~George Boas

 A few knowh Tag for Back To School Season:
#Queer Theory 
#Poetry 
#History You Should Know 
#Flag(s) History 
#Quotes and Quips 
#Spoken Word 
#Black/African American 
#Pink Triangle History 
#Book(s) 
#Documentary/Documentaries 
#Education

Education is learning what you didn’t know you didn’t know. ~George Boas

 A few knowh Tag for Back To School Season:

#Queer Theory 

#Poetry 

#History You Should Know 

#Flag(s) History 

#Quotes and Quips 

#Spoken Word 

#Black/African American 

#Pink Triangle History 

#Book(s) 

#Documentary/Documentaries 

#Education

LGBTQ* (YA) Novels To Keep On Your Radar

Hild by Nicol Griffith

(Following from Goodreads)
Hild is born into a world in transition. In seventh-century Britain, small kingdoms are merging, usually violently. A new religion is coming ashore; the old gods’ priests are worrying. Edwin of Northumbria plots to become overking of the Angles, ruthlessly using every tool at his disposal: blood, bribery, belief.Hild is the king’s youngest niece. She has the powerful curiosity of a bright child, a will of adamant, and a way of seeing the world—of studying nature, of matching cause with effect, of observing human nature and predicting what will happen next—that can seem uncanny, even supernatural, to those around her. She establishes herself as the king’s seer. And she is indispensable—until she should ever lead the king astray. The stakes are life and death: for Hild, her family, her loved ones, and the increasing numbers who seek the protection of the strange girl who can read the world and see the future.Hild is a young woman at the heart of the violence, subtlety, and mysticism of the early medieval age—all of it brilliantly and accurately evoked by Nicola Griffith’s luminous prose. Recalling such feats of historical fiction as Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Sigrid Undset’s KristinLavransdatter, Hild brings a beautiful, brutal world—and one of its most fascinating, pivotal figures, the girl who would become St. Hilda of Whitby—to vivid, absorbing life

LGBTQ* (YA) Novels To Keep On Your Radar

Hild by Nicol Griffith

(Following from Goodreads)

Hild is born into a world in transition. In seventh-century Britain, small kingdoms are merging, usually violently. A new religion is coming ashore; the old gods’ priests are worrying. Edwin of Northumbria plots to become overking of the Angles, ruthlessly using every tool at his disposal: blood, bribery, belief.

Hild is the king’s youngest niece. She has the powerful curiosity of a bright child, a will of adamant, and a way of seeing the world—of studying nature, of matching cause with effect, of observing human nature and predicting what will happen next—that can seem uncanny, even supernatural, to those around her. She establishes herself as the king’s seer. And she is indispensable—until she should ever lead the king astray. The stakes are life and death: for Hild, her family, her loved ones, and the increasing numbers who seek the protection of the strange girl who can read the world and see the future.

Hild is a young woman at the heart of the violence, subtlety, and mysticism of the early medieval age—all of it brilliantly and accurately evoked by Nicola Griffith’s luminous prose. Recalling such feats of historical fiction as Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Sigrid Undset’s KristinLavransdatterHild brings a beautiful, brutal world—and one of its most fascinating, pivotal figures, the girl who would become St. Hilda of Whitby—to vivid, absorbing life

Vintage Appreciation Post

Vintage Lady Friendships

LGBTQ* Children’s Books You May Have Missed:

One Dad, Two Dads, Brown Dad, Blue Dads

by Johnny Valentine, illustrated by Melody Sarecky

So this happened: Rebecca went to the children’s section of the library when working on our theses became a bit too much to bear, and this is what she found. Looks like the universe knew we needed something to cheer us up!

Published in 1994 from Alyson Wonderland (an imprint of Alyson Books), One Dad, Two Dads, Brown Dad, Blue Dads is a spectacular example of children’s authors who are doing it right. The book is inclusive of many kinds of diverse family structures and addresses the difficult-to-articulate complications of navigating awkward questions from strangers as a child in a family that might not fit into the cookie-cutter family structure depicted in many mainstream children’s books.

I hope you find time soon to grab a copy and snuggle up with someone you adore to celebrate the love we find in each other from all corners of the queer community.

<3 Ruth Elizabeth

(Source: queerbetweenthelines)

LGBTQ* Representations in Art, Graphic Novels, and Comics
Artist: Sam Orchard

LGBTQ* Representations in Art, Graphic Novels, and Comics

Artist: Sam Orchard

LGBTQ* Insight, Education and Ally Conversations
From Oregon State
— Roommate Questions/Answers
(You may want to pass this on to RAs in conversation)
Questions for Roommates
In the residence halls In a residence hall environment, we interact daily with a wide variety of people. Statistics have shown that at least 10% of the general population consider themselves to be lesbian or gay, and many more consider themselves to be bisexual. It is very likely that you will meet individuals who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) during your time at OSU. This page was developed to hopefully answer some of the questions you may have. Remember, you may ask these questions of your Residence Life staff as well.
Why do they flaunt their sexuality? “What people do in their own bedrooms is their own business, but I saw two guys walking across campus holding hands.”
One of the worst forms of oppression for a human being is to be denied emotional expression. Curiously, it is called “expressing love” when heterosexuals hold hands, but “flaunting” when LGBT people express their love. How would heterosexuals react if they could not hold hands, kiss, dance together, go to romantic dinners, or be married? LGBT people who are open with their affections are not trying to shock others, but are just doing what is natural to them and others.
What should I do if a friend tells me that he or she is gay? What does that say about me? Most LGBT people who “come out” would like the same sincere acceptance and encouragement you might want when you tell a friend something special about yourself. Because of many people’s “homophobic” attitude (fear and derision of same sex relationships), many gays are afraid of rejection from their friends. You might first honestly ask yourself how you feel about this news and then discuss it as a caring friend.
Some people who find out a close friend is LGBT wonder “What does that mean about me?” This is a natural reaction. What it probably means is that your friend trusts you very much. However, liking someone gay does not make you gay any more than liking someone smart makes you smart.
If my roommate “comes out” to me, does that mean that he or she thinks that I’m gay too? There is a big difference between “coming out” and “coming on.” As discussed above, most gay people who come out want to be accepted, not hassled. Sometimes a gay person might “come on” to you, tell you they are attracted to you, or want an intimate relationship with you. You can handle it in the same manner that you would handle a heterosexual approach. Gay love is as serious and legitimate as heterosexual love. Again, you should discuss it with your friend.
If I accept my LGBT roommate, will he or she bring in lots of LGBT friends and push me out? A formerly taboo subject will be out in the open. You may feel uncomfortable from a lack of experience dealing with gay people who are not “closeted.” The LGBT friends should respect non-LGBT people just as LGBT people expect to be respected. Visits by LGBT folks are a good opportunity to learn about this large and diverse segment of the population. However, be cautious about presuming that all your roommate’s friends are LGBT. His or her best friends may be straight.
Won’t my friends or parents think I’m gay if I have a gay roommate or friend or defend equal rights? Defending equal rights for gays is often a courageous stance to take. Some people may conclude that such a person has a vested interest to do so. It is up to you whether you feel that the people you are defending are worth the risk of occasional accusations or assumptions by others. Remember that a word from heterosexual friends and allies in defense or support of gay rights can go a long way to help change people’s minds.
Now that I know my roommate is gay, I don’t feel comfortable about nudity, dressing, showering, etc. More than likely, you have been living together long enough to trust each other. There is no reason for the trust to diminish now. Your roommate has been gay or lesbian all along! Bear in mind that gays are not always comfortable with non-gays, either. Gay people, just like straight people, are attracted to certain types of folks. Most gays and lesbians are not sexually interested in heterosexuals, just as the reverse is true.

LGBTQ* Insight, Education and Ally Conversations

From Oregon State

— Roommate Questions/Answers

(You may want to pass this on to RAs in conversation)

Questions for Roommates

In the residence halls 
In a residence hall environment, we interact daily with a wide variety of people. Statistics have shown that at least 10% of the general population consider themselves to be lesbian or gay, and many more consider themselves to be bisexual. It is very likely that you will meet individuals who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) during your time at OSU. This page was developed to hopefully answer some of the questions you may have. Remember, you may ask these questions of your Residence Life staff as well.

Why do they flaunt their sexuality? 
“What people do in their own bedrooms is their own business, but I saw two guys walking across campus holding hands.”

One of the worst forms of oppression for a human being is to be denied emotional expression. Curiously, it is called “expressing love” when heterosexuals hold hands, but “flaunting” when LGBT people express their love. How would heterosexuals react if they could not hold hands, kiss, dance together, go to romantic dinners, or be married? LGBT people who are open with their affections are not trying to shock others, but are just doing what is natural to them and others.

What should I do if a friend tells me that he or she is gay? What does that say about me? 
Most LGBT people who “come out” would like the same sincere acceptance and encouragement you might want when you tell a friend something special about yourself. Because of many people’s “homophobic” attitude (fear and derision of same sex relationships), many gays are afraid of rejection from their friends. You might first honestly ask yourself how you feel about this news and then discuss it as a caring friend.

Some people who find out a close friend is LGBT wonder “What does that mean about me?” This is a natural reaction. What it probably means is that your friend trusts you very much. However, liking someone gay does not make you gay any more than liking someone smart makes you smart.

If my roommate “comes out” to me, does that mean that he or she thinks that I’m gay too? 
There is a big difference between “coming out” and “coming on.” As discussed above, most gay people who come out want to be accepted, not hassled. Sometimes a gay person might “come on” to you, tell you they are attracted to you, or want an intimate relationship with you. You can handle it in the same manner that you would handle a heterosexual approach. Gay love is as serious and legitimate as heterosexual love. Again, you should discuss it with your friend.

If I accept my LGBT roommate, will he or she bring in lots of LGBT friends and push me out? 
A formerly taboo subject will be out in the open. You may feel uncomfortable from a lack of experience dealing with gay people who are not “closeted.” The LGBT friends should respect non-LGBT people just as LGBT people expect to be respected. Visits by LGBT folks are a good opportunity to learn about this large and diverse segment of the population. However, be cautious about presuming that all your roommate’s friends are LGBT. His or her best friends may be straight.

Won’t my friends or parents think I’m gay if I have a gay roommate or friend or defend equal rights? 
Defending equal rights for gays is often a courageous stance to take. Some people may conclude that such a person has a vested interest to do so. It is up to you whether you feel that the people you are defending are worth the risk of occasional accusations or assumptions by others. Remember that a word from heterosexual friends and allies in defense or support of gay rights can go a long way to help change people’s minds.

Now that I know my roommate is gay, I don’t feel comfortable about nudity, dressing, showering, etc. 
More than likely, you have been living together long enough to trust each other. There is no reason for the trust to diminish now. Your roommate has been gay or lesbian all along! Bear in mind that gays are not always comfortable with non-gays, either. Gay people, just like straight people, are attracted to certain types of folks. Most gays and lesbians are not sexually interested in heterosexuals, just as the reverse is true.

LGBTQ* Music Artists (And Songs On Our iPods)

Mary Lambert’s “Secrets”

……

I can’t think straight, I’m so gay

Sometimes I cry a whole day
I care a lot, use an analog clock
And never know when to stop
And I’m passive, aggressive
I’m scared of the dark and the dentist
I love my butt and won’t shut up
And I never really grew up

[Pre-Chorus]

They tell us from the time we’re young
To hide the things that we don’t like about ourselves
Inside ourselves
I know I’m not the only one who spent so long attempting to be someone else
Well I’m over it

[Chorus:]
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
So what
So what
So what
So what
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
So what

LGBTQ* Quotes Revamped 
Doctor Who Fandom Style
The only box we fit in at KNOWhomo is the Tardis. Like us, it is much bigger on the inside.


Bring on Peter Capaldi!  
&#8212; Also, doesn&#8217;t this photo of the  Tardis look a bit like the Bisexual Pride Flag?

LGBTQ* Quotes Revamped 

Doctor Who Fandom Style

The only box we fit in at KNOWhomo is the Tardis. Like us, it is much bigger on the inside.

Bring on Peter Capaldi!  

— Also, doesn’t this photo of the  Tardis look a bit like the Bisexual Pride Flag?

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
and probably never heard of…

JUGGS - The Place To Be
The following text and above picture from Trent Kelly’s Out In The Open:
Just Us Guys and Gals, or JUGGS for short, was the name of a East Coast social organization back in the 1930s. Membership was made up of Afro American men and women. By all outside appearances, JUGGS was the average nondescript social organization where professional men and women came to socialize, network, and throw the occasional fancy dress ball. These appearances were deceiving. This particular social club was made up of gays and lesbians. To onlookers from the street, straight couples were always seen entering and exiting the JUGGS premises as members mad every effort to “pass.” One sex used the other as a cover, often going so far as to wed each other to keep up the appearance of being a straight couple and keep questions from friends and family at bey. Behind the safety of its closed doors, freedom was found to live momentarily outside the closet and maybe find that special same gender romantic relationship in a secure environment absent from the fear of misreading the signs and mistaking a straight person as gay or lesbian.

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

and probably never heard of…

JUGGS - The Place To Be


The following text and above picture from Trent Kelly’s Out In The Open:

Just Us Guys and Gals, or JUGGS for short, was the name of a East Coast social organization back in the 1930s. Membership was made up of Afro American men and women. By all outside appearances, JUGGS was the average nondescript social organization where professional men and women came to socialize, network, and throw the occasional fancy dress ball. These appearances were deceiving. This particular social club was made up of gays and lesbians. To onlookers from the street, straight couples were always seen entering and exiting the JUGGS premises as members mad every effort to “pass.” One sex used the other as a cover, often going so far as to wed each other to keep up the appearance of being a straight couple and keep questions from friends and family at bey. Behind the safety of its closed doors, freedom was found to live momentarily outside the closet and maybe find that special same gender romantic relationship in a secure environment absent from the fear of misreading the signs and mistaking a straight person as gay or lesbian.

LGBTQ* People You Should Know
(AND) LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar
Colonel Sir Victor Barker D.S.O 1895 - 1960
 - Earliest documentation of Barker&#8217;s life recognizes him by the name Valerie Arkell-Smith 
- Early documentation/recordings report of Barker’s dysphoria and desire to be recognized as male
- (Arguably, due to societal pressure) Married twice to two different men&#160;; the later marriage producing two children
- In 1923, he began to express a more masculine recognized dress and presented as male going by the name Victor Barker.
 - Barker went on to marry Ms. Hayward   
**most likely with illegal documentation
-  Received a letter marked to Mr. Barker in 1926 to join the National Fascisti  (an anti-communist league which was loosely based on the British Fascisti)
- Trained young men in fencing and boxing
- Went on to become Colonel Victor Barker
- Baker was arrested later in life for forged documents and bankruptcy
- Some documentation shows that Barker later joined a side-show
- Died under the name Geoffrey Norton
Book: Colonel Barker’s Monstrous Regiment: A Tale of Female Husbandry — By Rose Collins
Synopsis:In an England devastated by the terrible losses of World War I, Colonel Victor Barker was a rare man indeed. Dashing, well-respected, with impeccable manners, he was a model gentleman. His wife was proud of his good breeding and fine looks, and his young son worshiped him as a war hero. But beneath the army uniform Barker hid an astounding secret. In 1929, following a sensational trial, the good colonel was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment. For Colonel Barker was, in fact, a woman. Her real name was Valerie Lilias Arkell-Smith, the most infamous “man-woman” of them all. Among Rose Collis’ books are A Trouser-Wearing Character, K.D. Lang, and The Mammoth Book of Lesbian Erotica. …Shrink

LGBTQ* People You Should Know

(AND) LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar

Colonel Sir Victor Barker D.S.O 1895 - 1960

 - Earliest documentation of Barker’s life recognizes him by the name Valerie Arkell-Smith 

- Early documentation/recordings report of Barker’s dysphoria and desire to be recognized as male

- (Arguably, due to societal pressure) Married twice to two different men ; the later marriage producing two children

- In 1923, he began to express a more masculine recognized dress and presented as male going by the name Victor Barker.

 - Barker went on to marry Ms. Hayward  

**most likely with illegal documentation

-  Received a letter marked to Mr. Barker in 1926 to join the National Fascisti  (an anti-communist league which was loosely based on the British Fascisti)

- Trained young men in fencing and boxing

- Went on to become Colonel Victor Barker

- Baker was arrested later in life for forged documents and bankruptcy

- Some documentation shows that Barker later joined a side-show

- Died under the name Geoffrey Norton

Book: Colonel Barker’s Monstrous Regiment: A Tale of Female Husbandry — By Rose Collins

Synopsis:In an England devastated by the terrible losses of World War I, Colonel Victor Barker was a rare man indeed. Dashing, well-respected, with impeccable manners, he was a model gentleman. His wife was proud of his good breeding and fine looks, and his young son worshiped him as a war hero. But beneath the army uniform Barker hid an astounding secret. In 1929, following a sensational trial, the good colonel was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment. For Colonel Barker was, in fact, a woman. Her real name was Valerie Lilias Arkell-Smith, the most infamous “man-woman” of them all. Among Rose Collis’ books are A Trouser-Wearing Character, K.D. Lang, and The Mammoth Book of Lesbian Erotica. …Shrink

LGBTQ* Vlogs: Bisexual Erasure

Camille, poised, educated, approachable, funny, and insightful as ever, offers her own insight and discusses bisexual erasure of those who identify as bisexual.

Camille, the creator and moderator of Tumblr’s GayWrites as well as AskGayWrites, is a site you I (Rebecca) will stand up for as one of my favorites on Tumblr. It is well sourced, researched, and like many blogs, Camille puts endless hours of her own time into the large project that is GayWrites.org.

Check her out! And, If you feel inclined, subscribe to her YouTube Channel.

LGBTQ* Hollywood and the Rest of the Story

László Ede Almásy’s Love Affair That Wasn’t

1996’s The English Patient:

(based on the novel by Sri Lankan-Canadian writer Michael Ondaatje) 

A French-Canadian nurse cares for Count László Ede Almásy, a burn victim, while he recounts his illicit love affair with his friend’s wife, their torrid affair and her death before dying himself (thinking fondly of here).

The Real László Ede Almásy:

Well, first off, László Ede Almásy was gay.

He was in love with a German Army officer during the war. He wasn’t burned, nor did he die at the end of WWII. Almásy went on to become a Soviet spy. 

 

KNOWhomo Reblog:

LGBTQ* Films, Monologues and Scenes You Should Know

Armand’s Speech in The Birdcage

You are missed, Robin. So deeply missed. 

Crisis Call Center
800-273-8255 or text ANSWER to 839863
Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week
http://crisiscallcenter.org/crisisservices.html

Depression and Bipolar Support 
800-273-TALK (8255)
Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week 
http://www.dbsalliance.org

National Hopeline Network
800-SUICIDE (784-2433)
800-442-HOPE (4673)
Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week
http://www.hopeline.com