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LGBTQ* Representations in Art, Graphic Novels, and Comics
Artist: Sam Orchard

LGBTQ* Representations in Art, Graphic Novels, and Comics

Artist: Sam Orchard

LGBTQ* Insight, Education and Ally Conversations
From Oregon State
— Roommate Questions/Answers
(You may want to pass this on to RAs in conversation)
Questions for Roommates
In the residence halls In a residence hall environment, we interact daily with a wide variety of people. Statistics have shown that at least 10% of the general population consider themselves to be lesbian or gay, and many more consider themselves to be bisexual. It is very likely that you will meet individuals who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) during your time at OSU. This page was developed to hopefully answer some of the questions you may have. Remember, you may ask these questions of your Residence Life staff as well.
Why do they flaunt their sexuality? “What people do in their own bedrooms is their own business, but I saw two guys walking across campus holding hands.”
One of the worst forms of oppression for a human being is to be denied emotional expression. Curiously, it is called “expressing love” when heterosexuals hold hands, but “flaunting” when LGBT people express their love. How would heterosexuals react if they could not hold hands, kiss, dance together, go to romantic dinners, or be married? LGBT people who are open with their affections are not trying to shock others, but are just doing what is natural to them and others.
What should I do if a friend tells me that he or she is gay? What does that say about me? Most LGBT people who “come out” would like the same sincere acceptance and encouragement you might want when you tell a friend something special about yourself. Because of many people’s “homophobic” attitude (fear and derision of same sex relationships), many gays are afraid of rejection from their friends. You might first honestly ask yourself how you feel about this news and then discuss it as a caring friend.
Some people who find out a close friend is LGBT wonder “What does that mean about me?” This is a natural reaction. What it probably means is that your friend trusts you very much. However, liking someone gay does not make you gay any more than liking someone smart makes you smart.
If my roommate “comes out” to me, does that mean that he or she thinks that I’m gay too? There is a big difference between “coming out” and “coming on.” As discussed above, most gay people who come out want to be accepted, not hassled. Sometimes a gay person might “come on” to you, tell you they are attracted to you, or want an intimate relationship with you. You can handle it in the same manner that you would handle a heterosexual approach. Gay love is as serious and legitimate as heterosexual love. Again, you should discuss it with your friend.
If I accept my LGBT roommate, will he or she bring in lots of LGBT friends and push me out? A formerly taboo subject will be out in the open. You may feel uncomfortable from a lack of experience dealing with gay people who are not “closeted.” The LGBT friends should respect non-LGBT people just as LGBT people expect to be respected. Visits by LGBT folks are a good opportunity to learn about this large and diverse segment of the population. However, be cautious about presuming that all your roommate’s friends are LGBT. His or her best friends may be straight.
Won’t my friends or parents think I’m gay if I have a gay roommate or friend or defend equal rights? Defending equal rights for gays is often a courageous stance to take. Some people may conclude that such a person has a vested interest to do so. It is up to you whether you feel that the people you are defending are worth the risk of occasional accusations or assumptions by others. Remember that a word from heterosexual friends and allies in defense or support of gay rights can go a long way to help change people’s minds.
Now that I know my roommate is gay, I don’t feel comfortable about nudity, dressing, showering, etc. More than likely, you have been living together long enough to trust each other. There is no reason for the trust to diminish now. Your roommate has been gay or lesbian all along! Bear in mind that gays are not always comfortable with non-gays, either. Gay people, just like straight people, are attracted to certain types of folks. Most gays and lesbians are not sexually interested in heterosexuals, just as the reverse is true.

LGBTQ* Insight, Education and Ally Conversations

From Oregon State

— Roommate Questions/Answers

(You may want to pass this on to RAs in conversation)

Questions for Roommates

In the residence halls 
In a residence hall environment, we interact daily with a wide variety of people. Statistics have shown that at least 10% of the general population consider themselves to be lesbian or gay, and many more consider themselves to be bisexual. It is very likely that you will meet individuals who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) during your time at OSU. This page was developed to hopefully answer some of the questions you may have. Remember, you may ask these questions of your Residence Life staff as well.

Why do they flaunt their sexuality? 
“What people do in their own bedrooms is their own business, but I saw two guys walking across campus holding hands.”

One of the worst forms of oppression for a human being is to be denied emotional expression. Curiously, it is called “expressing love” when heterosexuals hold hands, but “flaunting” when LGBT people express their love. How would heterosexuals react if they could not hold hands, kiss, dance together, go to romantic dinners, or be married? LGBT people who are open with their affections are not trying to shock others, but are just doing what is natural to them and others.

What should I do if a friend tells me that he or she is gay? What does that say about me? 
Most LGBT people who “come out” would like the same sincere acceptance and encouragement you might want when you tell a friend something special about yourself. Because of many people’s “homophobic” attitude (fear and derision of same sex relationships), many gays are afraid of rejection from their friends. You might first honestly ask yourself how you feel about this news and then discuss it as a caring friend.

Some people who find out a close friend is LGBT wonder “What does that mean about me?” This is a natural reaction. What it probably means is that your friend trusts you very much. However, liking someone gay does not make you gay any more than liking someone smart makes you smart.

If my roommate “comes out” to me, does that mean that he or she thinks that I’m gay too? 
There is a big difference between “coming out” and “coming on.” As discussed above, most gay people who come out want to be accepted, not hassled. Sometimes a gay person might “come on” to you, tell you they are attracted to you, or want an intimate relationship with you. You can handle it in the same manner that you would handle a heterosexual approach. Gay love is as serious and legitimate as heterosexual love. Again, you should discuss it with your friend.

If I accept my LGBT roommate, will he or she bring in lots of LGBT friends and push me out? 
A formerly taboo subject will be out in the open. You may feel uncomfortable from a lack of experience dealing with gay people who are not “closeted.” The LGBT friends should respect non-LGBT people just as LGBT people expect to be respected. Visits by LGBT folks are a good opportunity to learn about this large and diverse segment of the population. However, be cautious about presuming that all your roommate’s friends are LGBT. His or her best friends may be straight.

Won’t my friends or parents think I’m gay if I have a gay roommate or friend or defend equal rights? 
Defending equal rights for gays is often a courageous stance to take. Some people may conclude that such a person has a vested interest to do so. It is up to you whether you feel that the people you are defending are worth the risk of occasional accusations or assumptions by others. Remember that a word from heterosexual friends and allies in defense or support of gay rights can go a long way to help change people’s minds.

Now that I know my roommate is gay, I don’t feel comfortable about nudity, dressing, showering, etc. 
More than likely, you have been living together long enough to trust each other. There is no reason for the trust to diminish now. Your roommate has been gay or lesbian all along! Bear in mind that gays are not always comfortable with non-gays, either. Gay people, just like straight people, are attracted to certain types of folks. Most gays and lesbians are not sexually interested in heterosexuals, just as the reverse is true.

LGBTQ* Music Artists (And Songs On Our iPods)

Mary Lambert’s “Secrets”

……

I can’t think straight, I’m so gay

Sometimes I cry a whole day
I care a lot, use an analog clock
And never know when to stop
And I’m passive, aggressive
I’m scared of the dark and the dentist
I love my butt and won’t shut up
And I never really grew up

[Pre-Chorus]

They tell us from the time we’re young
To hide the things that we don’t like about ourselves
Inside ourselves
I know I’m not the only one who spent so long attempting to be someone else
Well I’m over it

[Chorus:]
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
So what
So what
So what
So what
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
So what

LGBTQ* Quotes Revamped 
Doctor Who Fandom Style
The only box we fit in at KNOWhomo is the Tardis. Like us, it is much bigger on the inside.


Bring on Peter Capaldi!  
— Also, doesn’t this photo of the  Tardis look a bit like the Bisexual Pride Flag?

LGBTQ* Quotes Revamped 

Doctor Who Fandom Style

The only box we fit in at KNOWhomo is the Tardis. Like us, it is much bigger on the inside.

Bring on Peter Capaldi!  

— Also, doesn’t this photo of the  Tardis look a bit like the Bisexual Pride Flag?

LGBTQ* History You Should Know
and probably never heard of…

JUGGS - The Place To Be
The following text and above picture from Trent Kelly’s Out In The Open:
Just Us Guys and Gals, or JUGGS for short, was the name of a East Coast social organization back in the 1930s. Membership was made up of Afro American men and women. By all outside appearances, JUGGS was the average nondescript social organization where professional men and women came to socialize, network, and throw the occasional fancy dress ball. These appearances were deceiving. This particular social club was made up of gays and lesbians. To onlookers from the street, straight couples were always seen entering and exiting the JUGGS premises as members mad every effort to “pass.” One sex used the other as a cover, often going so far as to wed each other to keep up the appearance of being a straight couple and keep questions from friends and family at bey. Behind the safety of its closed doors, freedom was found to live momentarily outside the closet and maybe find that special same gender romantic relationship in a secure environment absent from the fear of misreading the signs and mistaking a straight person as gay or lesbian.

LGBTQ* History You Should Know

and probably never heard of…

JUGGS - The Place To Be


The following text and above picture from Trent Kelly’s Out In The Open:

Just Us Guys and Gals, or JUGGS for short, was the name of a East Coast social organization back in the 1930s. Membership was made up of Afro American men and women. By all outside appearances, JUGGS was the average nondescript social organization where professional men and women came to socialize, network, and throw the occasional fancy dress ball. These appearances were deceiving. This particular social club was made up of gays and lesbians. To onlookers from the street, straight couples were always seen entering and exiting the JUGGS premises as members mad every effort to “pass.” One sex used the other as a cover, often going so far as to wed each other to keep up the appearance of being a straight couple and keep questions from friends and family at bey. Behind the safety of its closed doors, freedom was found to live momentarily outside the closet and maybe find that special same gender romantic relationship in a secure environment absent from the fear of misreading the signs and mistaking a straight person as gay or lesbian.

LGBTQ* People You Should Know
(AND) LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar
Colonel Sir Victor Barker D.S.O 1895 - 1960
 - Earliest documentation of Baker’s life recognizes him by the name Valerie Arkell-Smith 
- Early documentation/recordings report of Baker’s dysphoria and desire to be recognized as male
- (Arguably, due to societal pressure) Married twice to two different men ; the later marriage producing two children
- In 1923, he began to express a more masculine recognized dress and presented as male going by the name Victor Baker.
 - Baker went on to marry Ms. Hayward   
**most likely with illegal documentation
-  Received a letter marked to Mr. Baker in 1926 to join the National Fascisti  (an anti-communist league which was loosely based on the British Fascisti)
- Trained young men in fencing and boxing
- Went on to become Colonel Victor Baker
- Baker was arrested later in life for forged documents and bankruptcy
- Some documentation shows that Baker later joined a side-show
- Died under the name Geoffrey Norton
Book: Colonel Baker’s Monstrous Regiment: A Tale of Female Husbandry — By Rose Collins
Synopsis:In an England devastated by the terrible losses of World War I, Colonel Victor Barker was a rare man indeed. Dashing, well-respected, with impeccable manners, he was a model gentleman. His wife was proud of his good breeding and fine looks, and his young son worshiped him as a war hero. But beneath the army uniform Barker hid an astounding secret. In 1929, following a sensational trial, the good colonel was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment. For Colonel Barker was, in fact, a woman. Her real name was Valerie Lilias Arkell-Smith, the most infamous “man-woman” of them all. Among Rose Collis’ books are A Trouser-Wearing Character, K.D. Lang, and The Mammoth Book of Lesbian Erotica. …Shrink

LGBTQ* People You Should Know

(AND) LGBTQ* Books To Keep On Your Radar

Colonel Sir Victor Barker D.S.O 1895 - 1960

 - Earliest documentation of Baker’s life recognizes him by the name Valerie Arkell-Smith 

- Early documentation/recordings report of Baker’s dysphoria and desire to be recognized as male

- (Arguably, due to societal pressure) Married twice to two different men ; the later marriage producing two children

- In 1923, he began to express a more masculine recognized dress and presented as male going by the name Victor Baker.

 - Baker went on to marry Ms. Hayward  

**most likely with illegal documentation

-  Received a letter marked to Mr. Baker in 1926 to join the National Fascisti  (an anti-communist league which was loosely based on the British Fascisti)

- Trained young men in fencing and boxing

- Went on to become Colonel Victor Baker

- Baker was arrested later in life for forged documents and bankruptcy

- Some documentation shows that Baker later joined a side-show

- Died under the name Geoffrey Norton

Book: Colonel Baker’s Monstrous Regiment: A Tale of Female Husbandry — By Rose Collins

Synopsis:In an England devastated by the terrible losses of World War I, Colonel Victor Barker was a rare man indeed. Dashing, well-respected, with impeccable manners, he was a model gentleman. His wife was proud of his good breeding and fine looks, and his young son worshiped him as a war hero. But beneath the army uniform Barker hid an astounding secret. In 1929, following a sensational trial, the good colonel was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment. For Colonel Barker was, in fact, a woman. Her real name was Valerie Lilias Arkell-Smith, the most infamous “man-woman” of them all. Among Rose Collis’ books are A Trouser-Wearing Character, K.D. Lang, and The Mammoth Book of Lesbian Erotica. …Shrink

LGBTQ* Vlogs: Bisexual Erasure

Camille, poised, educated, approachable, funny, and insightful as ever, offers her own insight and discusses bisexual erasure of those who identify as bisexual.

Camille, the creator and moderator of Tumblr’s GayWrites as well as AskGayWrites, is a site you I (Rebecca) will stand up for as one of my favorites on Tumblr. It is well sourced, researched, and like many blogs, Camille puts endless hours of her own time into the large project that is GayWrites.org.

Check her out! And, If you feel inclined, subscribe to her YouTube Channel.

LGBTQ* Hollywood and the Rest of the Story

László Ede Almásy’s Love Affair That Wasn’t

1996’s The English Patient:

(based on the novel by Sri Lankan-Canadian writer Michael Ondaatje) 

A French-Canadian nurse cares for Count László Ede Almásy, a burn victim, while he recounts his illicit love affair with his friend’s wife, their torrid affair and her death before dying himself (thinking fondly of here).

The Real László Ede Almásy:

Well, first off, László Ede Almásy was gay.

He was in love with a German Army officer during the war. He wasn’t burned, nor did he die at the end of WWII. Almásy went on to become a Soviet spy. 

 

KNOWhomo Reblog:

LGBTQ* Films, Monologues and Scenes You Should Know

Armand’s Speech in The Birdcage

You are missed, Robin. So deeply missed. 

Crisis Call Center
800-273-8255 or text ANSWER to 839863
Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week
http://crisiscallcenter.org/crisisservices.html

Depression and Bipolar Support 
800-273-TALK (8255)
Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week 
http://www.dbsalliance.org

National Hopeline Network
800-SUICIDE (784-2433)
800-442-HOPE (4673)
Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week
http://www.hopeline.com

LGBTQ* Photographic History

Exhibit Carryin’ On

Photographs documenting LGBTQ* individuals of color

Photographers: Samuel Fosso and Charles ‘Teenie’ Harris

Aug 9

LGBTQ* People In History (of Great Importance)

The “Einstein of Sex”: Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld

14 May 1868 – 14 May 1935

Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld was a scholar, physician, sexologist, and arguably the first outspoken gay and transgender activist in modern history. 

Why he rocks?

Hirschfeld’s Accomplishments:

1. Jewish gay identified doctor, fought to end Paragraph 175 in Germany ( a law that made homosexuality punishable by law)

2. Founding member of Wissenschaftlich-humanitäres Komitee(WhK)  *English: The Scientific-Humanitarian Committee*, which acted as an advocacy group to many underrepresented individuals (including the LGBTQ population).

3. Led the FIRST congress for sexual reform

4. Co-wrote and acted in the 1919 film Anders als die Andem  (“Different From the Others”)

5. Created a way of cataloging identities, 64 of them, outside of “gay/lesbian,” including many ways to identify oneself outside of cisgender identification. Hirschfeld is one of the earliest scholars and advocates for the transgender community in Western culture. 

6. Created the Institute for Sexual Research, which became a safe haven for LGBTQ individuals in Berlin. 

7. Joined the Bund für Mutterschutz (League for the Protection of Mothers), fighting for women’s equality and the decriminalization of abortions

8. Lost his entire library and most of his life work to the Nazi party but was able to flee and save his life (and rumored to have saved a few others). Nazi soldiers burned the entire institution’s contents on May 6, 1933.

Imagine what the world might be if we still had all of his notes and the stories of hundreds of queer* identified and trans* identified individuals.

 

  1. (Photo Source:Magnus Hirschfeld)
  2. (Photo Source 2/3: International Sexological Congresses)
  3. (Photo Source: Institute for Sexology)
  4. (Photo Source: Nazis burning Hirschfeld’s Institute’s contents)

 

Aug 9
LGBTQ* Books (Currently) On Our To-Read Shelf
Following from Ariel Schrag’s Webpage
ADAM (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) When Adam Freedman—a skinny, awkward, inexperienced teenager from Piedmont, California—is sent by his parents to join his older sister Casey in New York City, he is hopeful that his life is about to change. And it sure does. It is the summer of 2006, a year of gay marriage demonstrations and the rise of transgender rights, and Casey has thrust herself into that scene. Soon, Adam finds himself part of a wild lesbian subculture complete with underground clubs, drinking, and hot older women everywhere he turns. It takes some time for him to realize that many in this new crowd assume he is trans—a boy who was born a girl—or why else would this baby-faced guy always be around?

Then Adam meets Gillian, the girl of his dreams — but she’s a lesbian and couldn’t possibly be interested in him. Unless—it occurs to Adam—passing as a trans guy might actually work in his favor…
Ariel Schrag’s scathingly funny and poignant debut novel puts a fresh spin on questions of love, attraction, self-definition, and what it takes to be at home in your own skin.
“Ariel Schrag’s book is a kind of ‘Adam in Wonderland,’ with its young hero exploring worlds usually kept underground. An insightful, funny, and unexpected love story, told with wit and compassion.” — Aimee Mann
"The sexual revolution is finally over, and Ariel Schrag has won. Adam is the most twisted, hilarious, and deeply gratifying reading experience I have had in a long time."  —Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home and Are You My Mother?
Personal Note:
I’m (Rebecca) a fan of Schrag’s graphic novels. I highly recommend those. Hearing that Schrag has a new work is quite exciting. At this time, I have not read Adam, but I am planning to in the next few weeks.
While I am not recommending the text, I do recommend the author. I also find myself drawn to read it after reading Bechdel’s thoughts on the text.
Has anyone read Adam? What’d you think? Does the subject material excite you? Does the premise make you cautious?

LGBTQ* Books (Currently) On Our To-Read Shelf

Following from Ariel Schrag’s Webpage

ADAM (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) When Adam Freedman—a skinny, awkward, inexperienced teenager from Piedmont, California—is sent by his parents to join his older sister Casey in New York City, he is hopeful that his life is about to change. And it sure does. It is the summer of 2006, a year of gay marriage demonstrations and the rise of transgender rights, and Casey has thrust herself into that scene. Soon, Adam finds himself part of a wild lesbian subculture complete with underground clubs, drinking, and hot older women everywhere he turns. It takes some time for him to realize that many in this new crowd assume he is trans—a boy who was born a girl—or why else would this baby-faced guy always be around?

Then Adam meets Gillian, the girl of his dreams — but she’s a lesbian and couldn’t possibly be interested in him. Unless—it occurs to Adam—passing as a trans guy might actually work in his favor…

Ariel Schrag’s scathingly funny and poignant debut novel puts a fresh spin on questions of love, attraction, self-definition, and what it takes to be at home in your own skin.

“Ariel Schrag’s book is a kind of ‘Adam in Wonderland,’ with its young hero exploring worlds usually kept underground. An insightful, funny, and unexpected love story, told with wit and compassion.” — Aimee Mann

"The sexual revolution is finally over, and Ariel Schrag has won. Adam is the most twisted, hilarious, and deeply gratifying reading experience I have had in a long time."  —Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home and Are You My Mother?

Personal Note:

I’m (Rebecca) a fan of Schrag’s graphic novels. I highly recommend those. Hearing that Schrag has a new work is quite exciting. At this time, I have not read Adam, but I am planning to in the next few weeks.

While I am not recommending the text, I do recommend the author. I also find myself drawn to read it after reading Bechdel’s thoughts on the text.

Has anyone read Adam? What’d you think? Does the subject material excite you? Does the premise make you cautious?

Aug 8

LGBTQ* Comedy and YouTube Videos 

You May Have Missed

Hannah Hart(of MyDrunkKitchentakes on the life-long question, “Is she gay?”

Aug 5

Gay Marriage / Same-Sex Marriage Political Cartoons

You May Have Missed

All cartoons pulled from Cagle.com

Aug 2
LGBTQ* Graphic Art You May Have Missed
*@&# Asexuals Hear
Graphic from Rational Hub (Facebook/Website)

LGBTQ* Graphic Art You May Have Missed

*@&# Asexuals Hear

Graphic from Rational Hub (Facebook/Website)