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KNOWhomo.tumblr Will Return In August

KNOWhomo.tumblr will be offline until August.

Everything is fine. A healthy team is a team that reflects, considers, and morphs into something stronger. We’re taking some time to learn what’s next.

Remember you’re educators and your patience creates safe spaces.

Keep On, Keeping On -

-Rebecca, creator and co-moderator of KNOWhomo

LGBTQ* Off-Topic History
Outlawing Cross-Dressing
Anti-cross-dressing laws were passed heavily in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century.
Following text from: Transgender History by Susan Stryker
San Francisco’s 1863 Ordinance:
If any person shall appear in a public place in a state of nudity, or in a dress not belonging to his or her sex, or in an indecent or lewd dress, or shall make any indecent exposure of his or her person, or be found guilty of any lewd or indecent act or behavior, or shall exhibit or perform any indecent, immoral or lewd play, or other representation, he should be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall pay a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars.
$500.00 (1863) = $8805 (2010 - estimated)
  Conversion based on $1.00 (2010) = $17.61 (1863)
  portrait: Francis Martin Drexel (1792-1863) Double Portrait 1822 

LGBTQ* Off-Topic History

Outlawing Cross-Dressing

Anti-cross-dressing laws were passed heavily in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century.

Following text from: Transgender History by Susan Stryker

San Francisco’s 1863 Ordinance:

If any person shall appear in a public place in a state of nudity, or in a dress not belonging to his or her sex, or in an indecent or lewd dress, or shall make any indecent exposure of his or her person, or be found guilty of any lewd or indecent act or behavior, or shall exhibit or perform any indecent, immoral or lewd play, or other representation, he should be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall pay a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars.

$500.00 (1863) = $8805 (2010 - estimated)

  Conversion based on $1.00 (2010) = $17.61 (1863)

  portrait: Francis Martin Drexel (1792-1863) Double Portrait 1822 

LGBTQ* Graphs, Charts and History
The Kinsey Scale
The Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale created by Dr. Alfred Kinsey in 1953.

LGBTQ* Graphs, Charts and History

The Kinsey Scale

The Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale created by Dr. Alfred Kinsey in 1953.

PRIDE 101 Posts (Color Expression) 
LGBTQ* Fashion and Expression
———————————————————————————————————————————————
THE HANKY CODE (note, this may be NSFW)
Click here for (Gay Male) chart
Created in the 1970s as a code between gay/bisexual men. 
AJ of the Beaver Bunch’s Female/Lesbian Hanky Code
— Click Here For (Lesbian) Chart

Also:
 
Black/White Checkered means Safe Sex. This should be something everyone communicates and practices without having to flag(IMHO). Be Safe So You Can Keep On, Keeping On. -Rebecca

PRIDE 101 Posts (Color Expression) 

LGBTQ* Fashion and Expression

———————————————————————————————————————————————

THE HANKY CODE (note, this may be NSFW)

Click here for (Gay Male) chart

Created in the 1970s as a code between gay/bisexual men. 

AJ of the Beaver Bunch’s Female/Lesbian Hanky Code

Click Here For (Lesbian) Chart

Also:

 

Black/White Checkered means Safe Sex. This should be something everyone communicates and practices without having to flag(IMHO). Be Safe So You Can Keep On, Keeping On. -Rebecca

LGBTQ* Slogan and Flag History
The Rainbow/Pride Flag creation is credited to Gilbert Baker; it debuted at the San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Freedom Day Parade in 1978.
The original flag had eight stripes:
pink (sexuality) — red (life) —orange (healing) — yellow (sunlight) — green (nature) — turquoise (magic) — indigo/blue (serenity) — violet (spirit)
Pink and turquoise have since been dropped.

LGBTQ* Slogan and Flag History

The Rainbow/Pride Flag creation is credited to Gilbert Baker; it debuted at the San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Freedom Day Parade in 1978.

The original flag had eight stripes:

pink (sexuality) — red (life) —orange (healing) — yellow (sunlight) — green (nature) — turquoise (magic) — indigo/blue (serenity) — violet (spirit)

Pink and turquoise have since been dropped.

LGBTQ* Film History You Should Know

WINGS (1927, Academy Award Winning Film)

What is it about?

Two young men, one rich, one middle class, who are in love with the same woman become fighter pilots in World War I.

Why is it important?

This film is the oldest surviving footage of a same-sex onscreen kiss and often believed to be the FIRST same-sex kiss on film. WINGS is an important addition to film and queer history with its honest portrayal of the bond and interaction between two men as watched by an audience via celluloid prior to the “macho - men are men” attitude which would go on to flood mentality and film a decade later.

LGBTQ* History in Photography
New York, 1982

(Source)

LGBTQ* History in Photography

New York, 1982

(Source)

LGBTQ* Deviant Artist You Should Know

Benjamin Ruth of Rebel Comix

creator of The Traveling Twinks! and (one panel of) Leaping Lesbians! - Your Illustrated Gay/Lesbian Homo Historians

KNOWhomo Repost:

Flags of Our Family

With flags being flown across the country, accompanied by dedicated voices, strength, and compassion, we provide a helpful history of some of the colors waving above our heads.

(for more information, check out #Flag)

knowhomo:

LBGTQ* Flag History

Transgender Flag

Left Photograph: (most widely recognized) Transgender Flag created by Monica Helms (1999).

*baby blue and pink to represent assigned gender colors; white to represent intersex and gender variant; pattern allows flag to be flown any way and remain the same (versatile to symbolize any path is the correct path)

Right Photograph: (alternative flag) Transgender Flag created by Jennifer Pellinen (2002).

* blue and pink to represent assigned genders; purple, lavender, and lilac to symbolize genders outside of male/female binary

LGBTQ* Novels/Books To Keep On Your Radar

Novels featuring Wom(y/e)n of Color Queer* Themes or Characters (1920s-1970s)

  1. Home To Harlem by Claude McKay (1928) - two scenes set in black lesbian bars, glimpses of early Harlem
  2. Young Man with a Horn by Dorothy Baker (1938) - Josephine Jordan, a  singer, has a relationship with Amy North, a wealthy woman
  3. The Wasteland by Jo Sinclair (1946) - novel depicting the oppression of women of color and opposition to women of color in lesbian circles 
  4. The Big Money by John Dos Passos (1960) - Harlem 1920s
  5. Loving Her by Ann Allen Shockley (1974) - one of the first novels to explore interracial relationships between lesbians
  6. Strange Brothers by Blair Niles (1975) - Book takes liberties and draws from Harlem lesbian culture of the 1920s 
  7. Ruby by Rosa Guy (1976) - West Indian girl finds friendship after relocating
  8. In Her Day by Rita Mae Brown (1976) - longtime friendship of Adele, a wealthy lesbian woman of color, and Carole, a working-class white lesbian woman
  9. Ed Dean is Queer by N.A. Diaman (1978) - San Francisco elects their new mayor (a queer woman of color) 

List/Information From:

Richards, Dell. Lesbian Lists: A Look at Lesbian Culture, History, and Personalities. Boston: Alyson Publications, 1990. p.34

LGBTQ* Books and Love Letters You May Have Missed
Empty without You: The Intimate Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt & Lorena Hickok
by Rodger Streitmatter (Editor), Eleanor Roosevelt
In 1978, more than 3,500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were discovered by archivists. Although the most explicit letters had been burned (Lorena told Eleanor’s daughter, “Your mother wasn’t always so very discreet in her letters to me”), the find was still electrifying enough to create controversy about the nature of the women’s relationship. Historian Rodger Streitmatter has transcribed and annotated more than 300 of those letters—published here for the first time—and put them within the context of the lives of these two extraordinary women, allowing us to understand the role of this remarkable friendship in Roosevelt’s transformation into a crusading First Lady. (text source)
                                 
 
(headline photo source)
 
 

LGBTQ* Books and Love Letters You May Have Missed

Empty without You: The Intimate Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt & Lorena Hickok

by Rodger Streitmatter (Editor)Eleanor Roosevelt

In 1978, more than 3,500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were discovered by archivists. Although the most explicit letters had been burned (Lorena told Eleanor’s daughter, “Your mother wasn’t always so very discreet in her letters to me”), the find was still electrifying enough to create controversy about the nature of the women’s relationship. Historian Rodger Streitmatter has transcribed and annotated more than 300 of those letters—published here for the first time—and put them within the context of the lives of these two extraordinary women, allowing us to understand the role of this remarkable friendship in Roosevelt’s transformation into a crusading First Lady. (text source)

                                 image

 
 
 
Jun 9
Did You KNOW?

You can access many of the popular #tags from KNOWhomo on our page? Anytime? 
When you’re on KNOWhomo.tumblr.com, just scroll down on the right side for over three dozen frequent tags.
And as always —-
Keep On, Keeping On!

Did You KNOW?

You can access many of the popular #tags from KNOWhomo on our page? Anytime? 

When you’re on KNOWhomo.tumblr.com, just scroll down on the right side for over three dozen frequent tags.

And as always —-

Keep On, Keeping On!

Jun 9

Books We’re/You’re Reading This Summer?

What are you reading this summer?

What would you recommend?

We’d love to know!

Jun 4

Asexuality/Ace Posts You (May Have) Missed

asexualityresources:

Based off this article.

Jun 3

Queer Anthems 101

Personal Note: When I was coming out this song was the lesbian/queer* women anthem in the clubs in Louisiana. I think we all have those songs we hold on to long after the glitter has washed away. -Rebecca

"Girl from the Gutter" — Kina

For all the things you said I’d never do
For all the things you said that were untrue
For all the times you made me feel alone
Said I’d never make it on my own

(chorus 1)
Things are lookin’ up for me now
Seems like Karma’s makin’ its rounds
Its my turn now, won’t be held down no
Karma’s gonna visit you too
You gotta pay for the things you put me through
I hope you do, I hope you do, yeah, yeah

(chorus 2)
I hope your hell is filled with magazines
And on every page you see a big picture of me
And under every picture the caption should read
Not bad for a girl from the gutter like me